Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

old new tip

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • old new tip

    time to refresh an old new tip, quite a while ago i found i could use a dremel stone as a file for cleaning up relief carvings. papasar followed up with a link to a double ended pin vice to hold the stone, ruby or diamond. now i am cleaning up a relief carving and i had forgotten this ol tip.
    Denny

    photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

  • #2
    And you mean the grinding stones they have not the square ended rectangle one that helps reshape the stones. I was using a stone in my DC dremel on very low speed to keep the stone somewhat clean. Good idea on the rotary stones in the pin vices - all sorts of them - old drills can have the jaws taken off and then it is a larger pin vise. Thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      yes, i was using a stone , teardrop or flame shaped, now i have a ruby flame or teardrop, not sure which name is which for shape. i always have the flat planes left from knives or furrows left from gouges, to clean up. sandpaper is not a favorite of mine, but for me the ruby or stone does wonders.
      Denny

      photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Something that I use occasionally, in my Dremel, is a pointed dowel. This is used to burnish areas, particularly crevices and helps remove straggling bits. Not as aggressive as a stone and is easily reshaped for different situations.
        'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

        http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
        http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          From time to time, I cut and carve a lot of marine shells: abalone, clam, oyster, etc. for inlay.
          With a stone wheel in the drill press, it plugs up with shell dust very fast.
          Same with sandpapers. Then friction cooks it.

          Run a crepe rubber stick on the moving abrasive. (Lee Valley) or use the sole of an old flip-flop foam rubber thong sandal.
          Works like an eraser and sucks all the dust out of the stones and papers.
          Brian T

          Comment


          • #6
            a couple good tips, easy to sharpen a dowel , and ive a stone i thought was ruined but still have it.
            Denny

            photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Gosh - Dad gave me a tip for the soldering iron - do wood burning ? - once hot, rub it on the inside of the heal - bottom of the shoe. The 'rubber' will smoke lightly and coat the iron. In soldering, the solder won't go where rubber was heated and applied. Now If I wear clogs/thongs/flip-flops that are foamy - how about a sponge... it will clean grind stones. Cool.

              Comment


              • #8
                If carving Cottonwood Bark, use a deer antler to burnish the wood to a nice sheen. Also brown grocery bags make an excellent "sandpaper' for final clean up of bird carvings.
                Enjoy!
                Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!

                My fb page: https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...8.100000156660 683&type=3

                Comment


                • #9
                  +1 for the brown paper bag trick. SR is so right. Works on all sorts of carvings.

                  To clean shell dust out of a stone wheel in the drill press, the crepe rubber stick from Lee Valley is amazing.
                  I could have spent hundreds of dollars on stone wheels.
                  I have just 2 of them. Just a few light touches and you can watch it clean up.

                  It will also save you a fortune if you do a lot of power sanding = don't push harder, clean the grit instead.
                  Brian T

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X