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  • #16
    yeah but, that is gettin sidetracked from you developing another method , need to keep following up on it.
    Denny

    photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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    • #17
      But that was the most difficult part, getting the burrdust on the glued area. . . .Hummm
      . . .JoeB

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      • #18
        i found one.
        https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=...9aACCDc&adurl=
        called a mini flocker applicator for suede tex fibers.
        its the pump gun for blowing felt into difficult areas. dont know it this link will be active, but you can copy paste. it was a google hit for a rockler tool site.
        Denny

        photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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        • #19
          Looks like you've got a good thing going there, Joe. Good thinking!
          Keep On Carvin'
          Bob K.

          My Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/rwkwoodcarving


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          My Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/rwkoz51/

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          • #20
            I use flocking on a deer antler mount I did a couple years ago. Worked pretty good. It's finely chopped polyester fibers. Lots of colors available. Put down some newspaper in your work area. Paint the surface you want to cover with thinned acrylic paint that closely matches the fibers. Put the fibers in a screen sifter or strainer. You don't need the fancy applicator they will try to sell you. Then tap it gently on the side of your free hand & move across the area to be covered. You may need someone to give you a 3rd hand to turn your carving. Cover it thick with flocking & let dry for a couple hours. Tap the carving gently to remove excess flocking onto the newspaper. Then just use the newspaper to funnel the excess back into the bag it came in. The place I ordered from is craftflocking.com

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            • #21
              I major use this method.....started with using it on fur areas of Santas, then progression to other carvings such as seaweed on the treasure chest, as dirt on habitat scene....and etc. One,... I use thick wood glue often that means old wood glue. I use wood shaving and sawdust also....I find that I need to make sure that the shaving is covered with some kind of glue for stabilization.....as it will pop off if brushed by someone. I will stain the wood shaving often multi times with various colors. . Although I have not made the area under showing as you did. The last project I put on the shaving using wood glue, let dry ...then stain with mini wax using a super thin brush to hit just the chips, dry ... then took thin CA and soaked the wood chip area to strengthen wood chips.....Finished with a matt finish...Like you I am still at the experimental level. .....But if you mess with it long enough you will make a nice looking texture surface,.....but people want to touch it....and if they are aggressive it will still pop off so I tell people it is fragile

              If I was attempting your project... I would use a finer wood shaving and perhaps sawdust, make sure slightly darker skin color plus maybe a blush cheek area under the whisker area, he looks dead....smile....and I would have darker wood chips mixed with lighter woods as often the beard is often dark color than the hair. I also take a pointed dental tool to poke holes in areas and to split or remove chips that are too big. Also cover with a matt finish just to keep the chips stabilized. I have glass jars of various size chips and various size sawdust for projects like this......, often make shaving using kutzall burrs. You will often see me on the ground scoop up chips and dust into jars for future usage....This is so experimental.....good luck in your own progression.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                But that was the most difficult part, getting the burrdust on the glued area. . . .Hummm
                I use steel wax and clay tools (dental tools)...Amazon ten dollars..71o6Uy3nKzL._SL1200_.jpg to apply glue to areas, and tweezers and various metal tools to put on chips and keep rags on hand to wipe off tools and my finger....and I do small areas at time as on a 3D surface the glue does not dry fast and pieces fall off. I got these tools and sharpen them to use for small details...today they are used to fill wood holes and things that have glue...including poking holes in the top of CA to open.....they are used often in my wood carving for various usage. These also where just used on a cement dragon for fine details...worked like a dream on that dry cement using a scraping motion.
                Last edited by Dileon; 01-31-2019, 01:43 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by drhandrich View Post
                  i seem to remember way back in highschool woodwork class, when we needed something felted, we brushed on a coat of glue, then had some kind of air puffing gun to blow some felt dust, onto the area. the gun worked sorta like the old insecticide spray guns (manual pumping) jeez, now i wonder if those things even still exist.
                  Denny that old procedure was known as 'flocking' if my memory serves me correctly. Like you say, it looked a lot like felt when applied, usually a green or red color. I'm sure someone still has this stored away on a back shelf somewhere. Another option might be to check out a model shop that specializes in materials for model train builders. They probably have something similar to the flocking for creating lawns etc. for the RR enthusiasts when they build their little towns and cities.

                  Tinwood

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                  • #24
                    Just was reading some info on using "negative ion generator" to help in adding the burrdust to carving.
                    Definitely more time going to be spent on this hairy problem
                    . . .JoeB

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                    • #25
                      Great idea and even better ideas to improve on it. Keep up the experiment JP, the results can only get better and better.

                      Bob
                      Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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                      • #26
                        Bob K~Thank you, I believe I was dreaming, had the idea the first thing when I woke up one morning. It kind just set there festering until Denny brought up how to add grass to his stand.

                        Uncle H.~Thank you for all the input

                        Di~Thank you for your insight. But "Steel Wax", never heard of it. Is it like Was or does it harden up after a while?

                        Bob~Thank you, Oh I plan on fiddle with it some more.

                        Right now I trying to get the Lichtenburg wood burner built, probably finish it tomorrow, then, of course, will have to play with the new toy. But I'm thinking about getting a 6" sieve and try to use a negative ionic generator with it.

                        Never fiddle around much with electricity before, so it going slow, want to keep what hair I have laid down on my head not sticking up in the air
                        . . .JoeB

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                        • #27
                          Neat idea Joe! You always come up with something different.
                          Terry

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