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    I discovered today that a small triangular file works very well for me to get a straight line. Once that was in place it was easier for me to use the V or U tools and stay straight. It has some use for curves as well

  • #2
    I use files, rasps and rifflers more than any carver I’ve met. A fact that has caused more than one old timer walk away shaking their head and mumbling. But a pencil and sharp tool should be adequate to carve a straight or curved line. Keep in mind you don’t need to take the full cut in your first pass. The tools must be sharp, not kind of sharp. Sharp enough to carve cross grain and leave a smooth surface.
    4FC436B5-5A3D-4653-BA27-7A0CE0C4C7C7.jpeg
    Ed
    Living in a pile of chips.
    https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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    • #3
      I use a file to clean up fuzzies
      Herb

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      • #4
        It is often helpful to make an incised line to guide further cuts, especially where you will have cross-grain curves.

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        • #5
          Jaeon: Any chance that you can cut to a straight pencil line on the wood?
          I found that a pull cut was a lot straighter than any push cut I could make.

          I'd do the first center line cut with something like a Moor large chip carving knife.
          Then come back to that on the two sides with a pair of skews, not a single V gouge.
          Brian T

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uvawyo View Post
            I use a file to clean up fuzzies
            My filing makes fuzzies !:-)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Brian T View Post
              Jaeon: Any chance that you can cut to a straight pencil line on the wood?
              I found that a pull cut was a lot straighter than any push cut I could make.

              I'd do the first center line cut with something like a Moor large chip carving knife.
              Then come back to that on the two sides with a pair of skews, not a single V gouge.
              It's the pencil lines I am having a bugger getting straight. I will pull then. Have to look up what a skew is.

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              • #8
                I understand. Metal ruler and a pull cut with a chip knife.
                A "skew" looks like a chisel with an angled cutting edge.
                I hold them in my fist and drag them also to make Vee-cuts in form-line carvings.
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                  I understand. Metal ruler and a pull cut with a chip knife.
                  A "skew" looks like a chisel with an angled cutting edge.
                  I hold them in my fist and drag them also to make Vee-cuts in form-line carvings.
                  Yep, that's what I do, too. I seldom use a vee tool; I prefer two cuts with a smaller chip carving knife. I find it more controlled.
                  Arthur

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                  • #10
                    I also use files of all sizes and shapes both for shaping and detail cleanup. For doing lines I have a inexpensive set of gunstock checkering tools I use often. They give a clean crisp lines and are easy to control. I also like a chip carving knife and fined I can cut straighter with the draw cut.

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                    • #11
                      Not a straight line tip, but for the smoothest curves with a v-tool - I always use a mallet. Light taps work very well.

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                      • #12
                        This is a very informative topic. Thanks!

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