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Using the camera before the carvings done

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  • #16
    Hi, It's a nice topic, Here is a useful content that can help you- Free photo editor

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    • #17
      i have done that took a picture before it was done and it helps me see flaws that otherwise i tend to overlook usually im disappointed it looks so bad lol but the other option i have is give it to my wife who will usually find something out of place right fast

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      • #18
        I use several editing programs including Gimp and Photoshop. Many other options out there also but whatever we are comfortable with is fine and carvers are certainly creative.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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        • #19
          I have an assortment of books which shows all the human body parts which are drawings of all different kinds of positions. I do a search on various positions normally in illustration form on the net and print out the photos for search. Photos although do not show any kind of form or depth.... that comes from experience.... For hands I used to look at my own as I carved...but can not do that anymore they are too disfigured to copy....LOL Photos are great information....but there is understanding that you can not use them for correct measurement unless you do the massive math work.

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          • #20
            I use Corel Paint Shop Pro for most of my image editing. It has a pencil effect. This is a photo I took the other day of a Canada goose along with what it looks like using the pencil effect. Is it the same thing?
            canadian2d.jpgcanadian2c.jpg
            Terry

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            • #21
              I also use a photo editing program to make some of my patterns. I think I've only done it once using an actual object to sketch lines over, though. My work is chip carving, so I often have photos of already-carved stuff and then use the various line tools to trace a portion of the pattern, then copy/paste/rotate so that I know the whole thing is exactly even and symmetrical. Then remove the background photo, print, and away I go.
              www.AgainstTheGrainChipCarvings.weebly.com
              www.facebook.com/AgainstTheGrainChipCarvings/
              www.etsy.com/shop/AgainstTheGrainChips

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              • #22
                When I see something in the wood, I usually draw it to convince myself of size and shape.
                Just a blunt drafting mechanical pencil, HB lead with no eraser so I can't hesitate and back up.
                Sometimes, there might be changes. So I use colored pencils (purple, orange, green, etc).
                Most of my cedar wood blocks are 24" long (with fine cracked ends) so 11" x 17" paper is just right.

                If it's bigger, a pole or a big glue up, I have a pantograph and a banquet roll of white paper.
                A banquet roll is cheap white paper table covering stuff, 36" wide and 100 feet long.
                Brian T

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