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When you don't have a band saw

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  • telecarver
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    A general purpose Roto-Zip bit in a router works great. You need a 1/4" to 1/8" collet adapter. It's fast and you can cut intricate shape easily. I have cut up to 2" thick in three passes. You can cut 3/4 material in one pass.

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  • Eddy-Smiles
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    If you get the Harbor Freight Oscillating tool, also get the $6.00, 0ne year full extra warranty. HF electric tools are notorious for burning out but if it lasts you a year then the chances are that you've got a good one. Besides that, a year will give you plenty of time to put it to the test. Besides, HF tools are so cheap that the extra $6.00 isn't going to hurt you anyway. My kid bought a an HF sawzall 5 years ago and it finally fell apart last month. So last week he went down and bought a replacement for $19.00 on sale with the $6.00 one year warranty because he doesn't have any projects scheduled for the immediate future. $26.00 for a reciprocating saw is peanuts plus he got a nice LED flashlight free.

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  • hstrick46
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    Thank you all. These are useful posts.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    Since that last post of mine, I've built up a Kestrel Tools Baby Sitka carving adze.
    Very effective rough-out tool. Long time in the learning of control but I see progress with each carving.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    You may be able to try your local high school. In Canada high school have wood shops and auto body and so on. Most would be more than happy to cut out a bird or what ever for you at no cost.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    Thanks, Jos. Nice to see someone who can do this with a little class. I've been using the fret-cut/blocks method for years. For big things, a bow saw, 4 teeth per inch. Even the flush-cut dowel saw (Veritas/Lee Valley) has its uses.

    If the top and bottom don't match, like a turtle shell, and the wood is curved, a bandsaw at any price is useless.

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  • jderijcke
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    you're right. Everybody is looking for what works for him/herself. And I think there is also an evolution. We look for what is we think best, then someone makes you think in another way (like you with the use of thath machine) and we change our way of work (in the future).
    Jos

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  • rickm
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    first let me say yr carvings are quite well done. and that is a saw I think the Japanese saw and since im lazy that's entirely too much work for me, but if it works for you and it seems like it does daat is goet mijn vriend

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  • jderijcke
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    this pictures (say more than words) show how I work, not having a bandsaw to create a blank. Once I have the blank I only use knifes and palmtools.

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  • rickm
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    well it seems that it would do a lot of the work that my recip does for me now. and the best part is the price \. think i will get one also and save the recip for finer work. thanks a bunch for passing this on

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  • SlowMover
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    I had wondered about the utility of those oscillating tools in carving. Now I see a use for them, maybe I will pick one up when I find a super deal (maybe Black Friday?).

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  • Sam
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    Here's a link to the HaborFreight Oscillating tools. Search results for: 'Oscillating Tools'

    I have lots of chisels, some homemade that are 2" + in width. When I use a chisel, I can't handhold my carving blank - it must be in a vise or some other holding device. Using the oscillating tool, I can hold with one hand and cut with the other. Keep in mind the depth of cut is only 1.5" or so, so you may have to approach from 2 sides. I have been using mine to progressively cut off 3x3" butternut blocks outlining my Santas. Sometimes my cuts are just shaving cuts moving my cutoff to the pencil line. Works better than coping saws too. The power makes short work of getting to a good starting shape.

    The brand I have is Dremel - 3amp, variable speed. The Harbor Freight model is good - I had several work people at my house using them. That is what gave me the idea. They said they liked the saw but not Harbor's blades. They said buy good blades at the big box stores - they last longer. I have a metal cutting blade that I have used to cut my knife making steel too. My local Harbor Freight is a new store having a Grand Opening - that's why their saw is $14.99, but $19 isn't bad either.

    I'm just passing along an idea that works for me. It is so easy to plunge cut straight in for outlining arms, and taking off big corners to outline heads, etc.

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  • rickm
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    ok but in a word no im trying to avoid all the mallet stuff as much as I can remember me arthritis? I can do it but ill pay for it later if there is a easier way im up for that first.

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  • woodeneye
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    I second what Robson said. After being advised of his method earlier, I have employed it to great success. Went out and bought a Marples 1" chisel and had all the other stuff. Went to town! That's what I use when I don't have access to my bandsaw and I'm on the road.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: When you don't have a band saw

    Try a bow saw for the fret cuts and a 30oz mallet+1" carpenter's chisel to knock off the blocks. I'm uncertain of the value of trading off a little bandsaw for a bunch of recip carving tools. NOT that I wouldn't do it in a financial minute!
    I add this only as it's an economical way to get around a bunch of really useful but costly power tools. For the 60" Raven, it is a fact that I only have to do it once.

    Leave a comment:

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