Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

In My Opinion!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • In My Opinion!

    Just for kicks and giggles I was surfing thru this channel looking for old tutorials. Myself, like a lot of the old timers on the Forum remember when the tutorials were all static and comprised of step by step photographs, unlike the plethora of video tutorials available now on YouTube. And as I was looking at them I ran across a tutorial by Rick of Little Shavers in Seattle on carving a face. It's dated 2005 and provides a link to the Little Shavers Website. Unfortunately that link is no longer valid. Rick has since passed away and all his knowledge and great information has left with him. And that's the problem. Books are ageless. Mankind has the written word going back well over 2,000 years. But all it takes for a digital library to disappear is loss of power, failure of a networking system, viruses, malware, or simply not paying a web hosting fee. I can't help but believe that this path were on, a steadily growing dependence on technology, could very well be our downfall rather than our savior. But it does make you wonder, how many other great carvers have left us and taken all their volumes of knowledge with them?

    image.png

  • #2
    When you mentioned Rick and Little Shavers, that brought back some memories to me. I had just started carving and had joined this forum in 2008. When I inquired about what tools to get, someone suggested that I order the Beginners set from Little Shavers. I did, and and still have it to this day ( although I destroyed the V tool trying to sharpen it) and use a couple of the gouges frequently.
    If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

    Comment


    • #3
      I bought my first carving tools from Little Shavers in 2008
      Herb

      Comment


      • #4
        But it is very easy to share information and instructions on the internet and reach a wide audience, as opposed to getting a book published. I have written and had a few articles published in WCI and back then, it was a year lead time before the article would appear. And it had to fit in a certain number of steps and pages and they wanted a sample so they could make their own photo for the first page or whatever. It was a little frustrating to write something and wait so long. By the time it was published, it seemed almost out of date compared to what i was currently carving. And we all know the value of stacks and stacks of old magazines; it's hard to give them away. Books that are valued and protected, certainly do outlast any storage that involves electronics or has to be plugged in, just like hand tools versus power tools. But it is certainly quicker to search for topics or articles online, versus manually flipping the pages of a stack of books, trying to locate something! There are advantages to each and disadvantages. You might never have heard of Rick if it wasn't for this web site!
        'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

        http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
        http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Eddy, your observation is well taken. Just yesterday at my eldest son's birthday gathering we were talking about how everyone takes so many pictures on their phones. I mentioned it was a mixed blessing...good for being able to share so much with others, bad in that there will be no hard copies to hand to future generations.
          Arthur

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah Rick's wife was still selling what inventory they had until a few months ago. I went to go to his website just like you did and It wasn't active any more. I've seen a few that have gone to website retirement land. Sad but to be expected.

            BobL

            Comment


            • #7
              @Mike: ofcourse you are right, but I have to agree with Eddy also.... following generations of archaeologists will not be able to finde much of ours, and will speak of 'dark ages', if no written remains exist. (no, I am not a pessimist, they will find our carvings and rewrite our history )

              Comment


              • #8
                Even now, we don't know for sure how Grinling Gibbons achieved the carvings we attribute to him. Perhaps this is good, because it forces us to pick up our tools and actually try the processes we imagine.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Deja vu, takes me back to listening to my mom and aunts sitting the kitchen table fretting about the demise of Woolworth stores.

                  I continue to be opposed to the use of carving instructions, not general instructions those which teach techniques but those step by step how to carve a pumpkin, wizard or whatever. I will continue to believe they stifle the creativity of the student.

                  When I started carving fish I watch several videos on attaching fins and then borrowing on that information I made fish but not by mimicking a step by step process trying to exactly follow anyone else’s process.

                  I watched a carver in Baton Rouge with over ten years experience who was carving a beautiful 14” St John the Baptist statue be immobilized when he did not have the size of #11 gouge the instruction he was following called for. I was dumbfounded watching him agonize over how to continue.


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Grinling Gibbons
                    AD9D5082-5335-4228-B5BD-1DD2842A5666.jpg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I bought the starter set from Rick back in late 1980s. Good fellow.

                      We have lost a lot of books/scrolls throughout our history and lost a lot of information. I do a lot of research and numerous court houses had fire and floods that destroyed records. Maybe the best solution is digitizing as much as we can now, as is being done.

                      I'm an "older than dirt" guy and prefer reading books, rather than from electronic devices. I do find youtube+ carving videos are a lot better than books, for me.
                      Bill
                      Living among knives and fire.

                      http://www.texaswoodartist.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I was in Seattle on business several years ago (2006) and arranged to meet Rick and his wife. We spent several hours in his garage workshop discussing carving in general and his tool making process. Rick gave me the carving on the left, and a rough out; I carved the one on the right from the rough out - changed it a little in a few places.
                        Claude
                        IMG_7904.jpg IMG_7905.jpg
                        My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
                        My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/
                        My Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/claudeswoodcarving/
                        My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I fall in the mixed blessing camp. Many good things come out of the technology world. But I think it minimizes the development of skilled craftsmen and women including carvers. I do not work with the youth as much as I did. But the last years I did I saw a big drop in interest in creating something with their hands. Many would say things like, that takes to much time a CNC can do it faster. They know how to tell the computer to do it but in a power outage they are lost. No real understanding of how things work or how to keep them working or how to make their own toys. The manual skills that are required to keep a community going or a household are slipping away.
                          Last edited by Randy; 07-24-2022, 05:25 PM.
                          We live in the land of the free because of the brave! Semper Fi
                          https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I like books. I am trying to accumulate as many "picture books" of the art and carvings from First Nations here in the Pacific Northwest. Pleased to say that I've done OK, duplicates are starting to show up. Used book dealers are hunting for me. Even the FN people will study an old carving from the 1800's and wonder; "how did they do that?" One common answer is: " with a tremendous amount of skill."

                            Several museum collections curated and photographed for publication. Now, the FN people are approaching the museums around the world, to ask for repatriation of art and carvings (eg masks) that might have been appropriated under unsavory circumstances. They've been successful. What is rightfully theirs is being ceremoniously returned. That spreads the objects far and wide again, never to be seen again by the general public. The puzzle is that so much of the FN work resides in private collections, never again to be seen in public. Very private people.
                            Brian T

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Both sides are so true. Possibly our society has collapsed before, when we keep digging up things we didn't know the ancients had, like batteries. How much of what we have today may of existed then, and look how long it took us to re-learn it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X