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  • Shellac as a sealer?

    Well, I'm going to try it on my next piece. Will Acrylic water base colors stick to it ok? Should the Shellac be scuffed up?
    http://oneofakindwoodcarvings.blogspot.com

  • #2
    Good question, I will be watching for replies
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CosmoQ View Post
      Well, I'm going to try it on my next piece. Will Acrylic water base colors stick to it ok? Should the Shellac be scuffed up?
      Cosmoq, I use a spray shellac as a sealer, have so for a good while. Best I've found for stiffening up the fuzzies. I haven't seen any downsides, and find it vastly superior to products labeled as "sanding sealers." The virtue of shellac, besides the fact that it dries in 10-15 minutes, in my experience, is that it dries harder than the other sealers I've tried and therefore better stiffens the fibers to be sanded off.

      I use water based paints and they adhere perfectly to the shellac.
      Arthur

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      • #4
        However, I thought water on shellac will make a "milky" stain? Thinking of glass rings on a piece of furniture that is finished with shellac.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post
          However, I thought water on shellac will make a "milky" stain? Thinking of glass rings on a piece of furniture that is finished with shellac.
          Bill, that's true, but I've never removed the paint to see if the shellac was marred! LOL

          Seriously, it has no effect on the paint, in my experience.
          Arthur

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

            Bill, that's true, but I've never removed the paint to see if the shellac was marred! LOL

            Seriously, it has no effect on the paint, in my experience.

            OK, it will mar the shellac, not the finish. Didn't think of it that way. So yes, I can see a finish being immune to the shellac...good perspective. Touche.
            Bill
            Living among knives and fire.

            http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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            • #7
              Thanks Arthur! That's good to hear.
              http://oneofakindwoodcarvings.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                Spray shellac I'm not familiar with and wonder how it translates to a solid shellac? Meaning the lb cut, dilution, etc. You got my interest, Arthur.
                Bill
                Living among knives and fire.

                http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post
                  Spray shellac I'm not familiar with and wonder how it translates to a solid shellac? Meaning the lb cut, dilution, etc. You got my interest, Arthur.
                  Bill, the spray can doesn't state the cut, but it's got to be thin to spray in an aerosol. Actually, being thin is a plus for a sealer in my opinion, as I just want it to stiffen the fibers to sand off, and it doesn't fill in the details. After sanding you could give the piece another spray if you like, but I don't find it necessary.

                  I do keep amber brush-on shellac on hand to use in lieu of a stain, or in combination with a stain, on some pieces, so I'm not opposed to the heavier cut shellac, I just prefer the spray for the sanding sealer.
                  Arthur

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

                    Bill, the spray can doesn't state the cut, but it's got to be thin to spray in an aerosol. Actually, being thin is a plus for a sealer in my opinion, as I just want it to stiffen the fibers to sand off, and it doesn't fill in the details. After sanding you could give the piece another spray if you like, but I don't find it necessary.

                    I do keep amber brush-on shellac on hand to use in lieu of a stain, or in combination with a stain, on some pieces, so I'm not opposed to the heavier cut shellac, I just prefer the spray for the sanding sealer.

                    Thanks Arthur. I'm going to give it a try on some "sacrificial" discard pieces and see how it works. Suspect you use something similar to: https://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-Zi.../dp/B0009X8HWG ?
                    Bill
                    Living among knives and fire.

                    http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post


                      Thanks Arthur. I'm going to give it a try on some "sacrificial" discard pieces and see how it works. Suspect you use something similar to: https://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-Zi.../dp/B0009X8HWG ?
                      Yep, that's the one I use, Bill. I get it at Home Depot or Lowes, can't remember which. I don't remember what I pay for it, but seems to be about what Amazon is quoting.
                      Arthur

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

                        Yep, that's the one I use, Bill. I get it at Home Depot or Lowes, can't remember which. I don't remember what I pay for it, but seems to be about what Amazon is quoting.

                        I'll get it from Amazon since we live in a small rural town. No building supply chains here, nor much else.

                        Thanks again for all the info.
                        Bill
                        Living among knives and fire.

                        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                        • #13
                          Fellow carvers, I just "sealed" my latest piece with shellac... and I'm wondering why I didn't ask this question when I first joined this Forum! Wow! What a difference! I'd estimate that there is at least a 95% reduction in grain swelling to the piece and what did (barely noticeable) swell was easily knocked down with a 250grit burr. I did run the burr over the entire piece to reduce the shine and give better adhesion. The piece was also dry in an incredible short amount of time. I did let it set for several hours before I wanted to smooth out the piece for color coat. Here's a few photos of the "sealed" piece. It's called: "Goofy Lines Up The Stake!" I'll post finished photos in a few days.
                          Thanks again Arthur!
                          Dave
                          http://oneofakindwoodcarvings.blogspot.com

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                          • #14
                            I forgot to mention, the photos of this piece are taken before I ran the burr over the piece.
                            Dave
                            http://oneofakindwoodcarvings.blogspot.com

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                            • #15
                              Dave, I thought you'd like it! That's the best thing about the Forum, we share information freely, and "scratch each others' backs."

                              By the way, darn nice carving job there.
                              Arthur

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