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  • Beeswax Finish

    Can beeswax finishing wax be applied to painted carvings? And if so, would the painted carving need to have some sort of sealant on it first?

  • #2
    I have used beeswax as a waterproof finish on birch carvings (dishes) at my kitchen sink.
    It picks up dust and you can't wipe it off. For appearance, it isn't matte, satin or gloss unless you power-buff it.
    I applied it melted (ultra messy) and did my usual oven-baking process to set the wax into the raw wood.
    As waterproofing, it is exactly what I wanted but I'll never bother with buffing up any kind of a shine.

    I can buy acrylic finish (matte, satin and gloss) in a bottle to mix with paints or apply alone.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      I use Howard Feed N' Wax after I have dipped my carvings in BLO. I paint with thinned acrylics. All the BLO and Howard's finish does is soften and deepen the colors. I have never had an issue with the Howard product.

      I let the Howard product sit on the carving about 20 minutes before I wipe off with a soft cotton cloth. In my opinion, it really finishes off the carving.

      I have never sealed a carving either before or after painting, unless you count the BLO and Howard product.

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      • #4
        Hi Sammy , I have never used Beeswax on my Carvings ,but always use Poly U on Painted Carvings before putting Feed-n-wax . I feel it's another protective coat to protect the Paint . Merle

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        • #5
          I seal my carvings with satin Deft lacquer first then add a coat of Howard Feed N Wax. I let the Feed N Wax sit for 20 minutes then rub it down with a cloth and buff it good with a horsehair shoe brush.
          Keep On Carvin'
          Bob K.

          My Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/rwkwoodcarving


          My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


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          • #6
            never had much luck with beeswax i have tried it on unfinished bowls and was never happy with it

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            • #7
              I don't understand the reasoning behind using wax over a protective clear finish coat. Another thing I don't understand is the use of Feed N Wax...you can't "feed" dead wood, and it doesn't penetrate a clear coat anyway. Of course, those are just a couple of the very many things I don't understand. Not trying to step on anyone's toes here!
              Arthur

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              • #8
                Wax can make the object waterproof, in all the cases I am familiar with. However, I use Johnson's paste floor wax over tung oil or BLO. I realize BLO is waterproof but I like the look of the wax over it and adds some depth.
                Bill
                Living among knives and fire.

                http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                • #9
                  Thanks for all of your answers. I wanted to try a wax type coating, but was unsure how to proceed. Sure appreciate the help!

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                  • #10
                    Bees wax is a soft wax, Johnsons floor wax is a harder wax, both will attract dirt like Brian said.
                    Both will cover the paint without sealing it, however if you ever wanted to remove the wax sealing first would be a good idea. As for adding wax, has anyone tried a product like wood floor wax and shine? It dries hard and is removeable with a warm water and a rag. Unlike poly, which would require sanding to remove. Just wondering out loud here, thoughts?

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                    • #11
                      Sammy, in Doug Linkers video on YouTube of his carving of a scarecrow he mentioned that after painting and a watered down antiquing wash he rubbed some Clapham's beeswax salad bowl finish on the carving. Have not used this myself but thought I'd mention it to you.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks. I originally got interested in the "wax" finishing question because I have seen a foreign carver's work and that is what he uses. The finish on his carvings and what it does to the colors is stunning. It creates a very muted and elegant appearance in his work. (Plus he must spend hours sanding his work.)

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