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Using Blending Medium with Acrylic Paints

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  • Using Blending Medium with Acrylic Paints

    I have been using Liquitex Heavy Body artist acrylics to paint my carvings for a few years as they cover much better than the craft-type acrylic paints and dry quickly. I have tried to recreate blending effects that I used to use when painting with oil paints with no luck. Before I make a switch over to artist oils. I was going to try the Liquitext Slo-dri Blending medium to see if it can help to blend colors to create the kind of results I have seen in Betty Padden's Christmas Ornament book without needing days to dry.

    If anyone has any experience with this, some advice would be greatly appreciated. I have a week off at Thanksgiving and four weeks off in December and hope to carve and paint many items along with watching westerns, working on my toy train layout, and taking a nap here or there!

    Thanks,

    Tim

  • #2
    Tim, I do not have experience with the Liquitex acrylics. However, reading what I can find about them and the blending medium, it sounds like you are on the right track trying it. In the time you have off, you can at least experiment. Please show us your results, as I am sure others will be interested.

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    • #3
      Tim,

      I know nothing about paint as I don’t use it. But I’m always impressed by someone who’s taken the time to plan ahead.
      Ed
      Living in a pile of chips.
      https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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      • #4
        Tim, I agree with Sappy, let us see your results and comments after trying it.
        Arthur

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        • #5
          If your ground (the wood) is less than white, you might want to do an "underpainting"
          in either white or possibly the contrasting color as did some renaisance painters.
          For red walls, the underpainting is green.

          Western red cedar is usually a brown color, all the way down to a deep chocolate.
          When I want to paint parts of a carving, I do an underpainting all in white.
          Color over that (regular acrylics) is very nice.
          Brian T

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          • #6
            [QUOTE=Brian T;n1166369]If your ground (the wood) is less than white, you might want to do an "underpainting"
            in either white or possibly the contrasting color as did some renaisance painters.
            For red walls, the underpainting is green.

            Brian, if the background is painted over, what does the underpainting accomplish? I've heard this before, but don't understand the principle.



            Arthur

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            • #7
              I do the underpainting in all white now. I don't want to see the reds, yellows and greens darkened from the brown cedar underneath. Seems to turn out like I hoped.

              The contrasting color underpainting.
              It has something to do with the color of the light from the underpainting reflected through the top coat.
              Makes the colors more intense. Do a yellow underpainting and put blue on top for a deeper blue.
              Maybe that mattered with the pigments of 2 centuries ago. I know it was done, I've seen examples
              but I can't be bothered for the patches of color that I use.

              Brian T

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PittsburghTim View Post
                I have been using Liquitex Heavy Body artist acrylics to paint my carvings for a few years as they cover much better than the craft-type acrylic paints and dry quickly. I have tried to recreate blending effects that I used to use when painting with oil paints with no luck. Before I make a switch over to artist oils. I was going to try the Liquitext Slo-dri Blending medium to see if it can help to blend colors to create the kind of results I have seen in Betty Padden's Christmas Ornament book without needing days to dry.

                If anyone has any experience with this, some advice would be greatly appreciated. I have a week off at Thanksgiving and four weeks off in December and hope to carve and paint many items along with watching westerns, working on my toy train layout, and taking a nap here or there!

                Thanks,

                Tim
                Tim,

                I switched from craft-type acrylic paints for the same reason. I went with Golden Open when it became available. I suspect they are similar. This is a link to Golden Open: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zvYMABtK9w

                Neil
                http://www.tristatecarvers.com

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                • #9
                  One of the problems I've found with the acrylics, even with extender, is that it instantly sinks into the wood surface. If I know I need to blend colors, I will seal the carving with a diluted (1:1) flat water-based varnish. After that dries, I can add extender to the paint and do some blending. Sometimes I have to seal the end grain areas with 3-4 coats of the flat varnish.

                  Claude
                  My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                  My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                  My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                  • #10
                    I use artist acrylics and hobby grade. When I needed a lot of Red and black and white and green I went to large tubes. One caution however - there are often two grades - full body means coverage = 100%. I got some that were not full body and they were more like tints. Had to much clear mixed in it was used for over painting and mixing of colors. Hobby stuff is unique to themselves. Some are ceramic based and other mixes. I have a collection of pearl colors and such.

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                    • #11
                      Neil Ward, thank you for the link. The Open product looks great. Dries faster than oil, but enough time to blend. I hope the Slo-dri product gives similar results as I have a fairly good palette of the Liquitex Heavy Body paints and they are not cheap.

                      Claude, that is something that I need to experiment with as well. I see a lot of recommendations for various blends of polyurethane or boiled linseed oil. I was thinking of trying a dewaxed shellac as I am accustomed to using it on woodworking (mostly furniture) projects. Shellac is somewhat of a universal sealer and it dries quickly.

                      Thanks to all who replied,

                      Tim

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                      • #12
                        I use craft paint only. Since I dilute them about 10:1 they perform perfectly. Personally I like using washes of color, so that the piece looks like wood and not plastic/ceramic. I tried using acrylic artists paint and just couldn't get them to work for me.
                        The best idea is to experiment and see what works best for you.
                        Steve
                        Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
                        My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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