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Inconsistent staining (first time)

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  • Inconsistent staining (first time)

    So as an experiment tried a stain marker on a small basswood carving here. Is it the wood the pen, myself or all of it that makes it all look so uneven?

  • #2
    Cheated the pen and was able to fix the front effect a bit.

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    • #3
      Aesc...In my opinion it's the wood that doesn't accept stain evenly. Soft woods such as bass, popular, pine, have a problem staining evenly. This is further complicated by your knife cuts and imperfections in the wood. Recommend a sealer prior to staining so that the stain goes on more evenly.

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      • #4
        Doh, some research beforehand would have helped. Thank for the info will try a different finishing method.

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        • #5
          Raw basswood is porous and will soak up liquid stain, but it will vary with end grain, details, the blocking effect of skin oils on the wood, etc. The exposed end grain will wick the stain deep into the wood, causing blotchiness. To control this you might try sealing the wood with water-based polyacrylic or boiled linseed oil or wax. Then you have to decide between water or oil-based stain or a gel stain. You should experiment with scrap wood to discover how you will control the effect.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pallin View Post
            Raw basswood is porous and will soak up liquid stain, but it will vary with end grain, details, the blocking effect of skin oils on the wood, etc. The exposed end grain will wick the stain deep into the wood, causing blotchiness. To control this you might try sealing the wood with water-based polyacrylic or boiled linseed oil or wax. Then you have to decide between water or oil-based stain or a gel stain. You should experiment with scrap wood to discover how you will control the effect.
            Will do. Thanks for all the info. Made this piece just for the experiment.

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            • #7
              There is a prestain made specifically to address this problem. Minwax makes the one I use, and it does the job.
              Arthur

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              • #8
                Aesc,

                I haven’t been doing this as long as a lot of people on this site. What I’ve seen here and at my local carving group is that most carvers find a finishing process that works for them. Then with a variation here and there they stick to it. You’ve got the always start with something thinned 50/50 with whatever they like and thinners ranging from mineral spirits to lacquer thinner. You’ve got the water based crowd and the oil based guys and gals. Then there’s the natural group using walnut oil cinnamon and finely ground coffee. The folks who think Formby’s Tung oil is a hand rubbed oil finish as if they’d used pure tung oil. Let us not forget the waxers who regardless of what finish they apply feel no project is really complete with out a coat of wax to “feed the wood”. The beauty of being a carver is they are all doing it the right way. They are doing it their way.

                So I’d encourage you to read the suggestions you find here try them out. Find the one that produces the look you want and with a variation here and there own it. Best of luck.

                MTCW:

                If I’m keeping it simple I use pure dark or light tung oil to add some color, a few coats of gloss poly and finishing with two sprayed coats of satin poly

                If it’s a project I’m really committed to. Trans-tint makes an additive allowing to tint oil based poly.
                This is an extensive process.
                1. Two coats of Charles Neils pre-color conditioner
                2. gloss poly, allow to dry
                3. 320 grit VERY lite sanding then Tinted gloss poly, allow to dry
                Repeat step 3 until you get the desired color. This will take several days as each coat needs to dry fully.
                I usually sand one more time and the spray on two coats of satin poly.
                It’s a long process butt I get the color I want and the wood grain shows through.

                Basswood eggs with trans tint finish left egg is over Neil’s right is over a gloss poly base.

                8A5391B7-AAAE-4455-A0B5-935970CB1D2A.jpeg
                No offense intended, I just realized I didn’t mention the pre-stainers and shellacers. We’re all in this together guys.
                Last edited by Nebraska; 10-30-2019, 09:46 AM.
                Ed
                Living in a pile of chips.
                https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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