Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Restoring old and dry wood carvings or projects.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Restoring old and dry wood carvings or projects.

    I have had a number of olderd carvings and other wood projects like bowls that have dried and dulled over the years. I know this is a issue for my of use who work with wood. I thought it would be interesting to see what others use for dealing with this. For myself, after many years of trying different products I have settled on "Hower's Feed & Wax" for almost every thing that has that issue, from walkingsticks to wood furniture. For wood projects for food I use Howerd's bucher block conditioner or their mineral oil. The mineral oil is what I use on cutting boards and spoons for thier first finish. I look forward to hearing what others have found they like to use.

  • #2
    Hi Randy, I have used Howard Feed-n- Wax when I started Carving and very Pleased with it . In fact I'm close to ordering my 3rd Bottle now . It seems to last forever . Merle

    Comment


    • #3
      I liked the appearance of MinWax Tung Oil Protective Finish, over at the rustic furniture shop.
      One coat is satin, 4 coats is water-wet glossy. Mainly I do one sloppy wet coat and leave it at that unless I want that bright reflective gloss.

      I use artist's acrylic paints and acrylic medium as the proper thinner, never water.

      Big carvings for outdoors get a coat or two of hardware store house paint = nothing better.

      I put polyurethane on some carvings that wound up outdoors facing the sun and they turned gray in less than 2 years.

      I was introduced to Renaissance Wax as a finish for metals, shells and stones. Must buy some.
      A fine rubbed coating appears to resist tarnishing for a long time. Rio Grande jeweler's supply house carries 2 size cans of it.

      Brian T

      Comment


      • #4
        Randy,

        I would think it depends on how the piece was finished in the first place. I really didn’t know much about wood finish before I started carving. When I saw how basswood end grain soaked up color I started researching how to finish wood. In fact that’s how I found this forum. I did a lot of online research readIng probably close to 100 articles and threads on this and other forums.

        I soon found myself placing writers and contributors into one of three categories.

        The myth sharers. These guys and gals share how grandpa did it or whoever’s shared knowledge they embrace.

        The salesman. Well these writers sometimes provide a little good information around the edges mostly they are convincing me their product is going to make my carving look like Ian Norbury did it and may cure hangnails at the same time.

        The scientists. They talk about molecule size and tested processes, great reading if your looking for that afternoon nap.

        WAX: Now here is the part I’ve been trying not to get to. My experience is people like their myths and friendly salesman...... The general consensus of the scientists that wax was used to finish wood because it was cheap and readily available. Most don’t even consider wax a true wood finish. They consider it a wood polish. Something about it not bonding with the wood and neither the wax or wood is changed by being put together. That said if you're happy rubbing wax on your wood. Well it’s your wax and your wood you should do what makes you happy. Just don’t expect it to actually preserve your project.

        Oils: Finish experts talk about two kinds of oils. Hardening and non-hardening. Linseed, tung and some nut oils are hardening oils are considered wood finish because they polymerize, chemically changing in the wood and bonding to the wood. These process take about a month. If you seal the wood to soon it stops the process.

        shellac varnish poly etc. These are top coats that bond with and seal the wood not known for deeply penetrating, it the molecular size thing and yes it does matter. At least the scientists say so.
        Last edited by Nebraska; 07-06-2020, 07:44 AM.
        Ed
        Living in a pile of chips.
        https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

        Comment


        • #5
          Modern wood finishes are based on science (organic chemistry).

          A practical understanding of wood anatomy at the microscopic level is an advantage.
          That's because no two woods are the same.

          My baked in oil finish uses Charles' Law of gas physics.
          Three minutes and thirty seconds and it's done for good.

          At the end of the day, do whatever and use whatever gives you the intended finish.
          Brian T

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=Nebraska;n1182935]Randy,

            I would think it depends on how the piece was finished in the first place. I really didn’t know much about wood finish before I started carving. When I saw how basswood end grain soaked up color I started researching how to finish wood. In fact that’s how I found this forum. I did a lot of online research readIng probably close to 100 articles and threads on this and other forums.

            As you say Ed there are is a ton of information on wood finishing. Tung oil or spar urethane are my choices on most things I do. I also use Tru-oil some. The Feed & Wax is citrus oil and bees wax. It works well in restoring the dull look old finishes get. I have not found a old finish it will not improve So far.

            Comment


            • #7
              One of the factors unique to woodcarving is the finish is often applied to an irregular surface. If you make a mistake, it is very difficult to undo it. With a deep relief carving, it is often difficult to get a smooth finish in the first place. If you are spraying the finish, how do you cover the undercuts?
              099.JPG

              Comment


              • #8
                My observation is carvers find a process that produces a look they like with minimal risk of screwing up a project they’ve invested hours in. Once found they stick to it despite what the science says about what would be best for protection of the wood. Trying real hard not to make a political comment here. Made it. Ultimately if your happy with the appearance and durability stick with it. If not do your homework and try something new.
                Ed
                Living in a pile of chips.
                https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just curious How would you guys rate tru-oil versus Minwax tung oil? Is there much difference between the two products or are they very similar?

                  One of the problems I find with tru-oil is that it will form a skin in a half empty bottle which can be a pain when you end up with small lumps all over your work that have to be cleaned off I strain the stuff through a nylon stocking when it gets like that and put it in a smaller container to keep the air volume down to try and prevent that happening.

                  Does the tung oil behave this way. The Formby's tung oil made by minwax that we can get here runs at NZ $259.00 a litre can so don't want to buy the stuff to find it goes the same way as true oil.Could get 10 100ml bottles and decant the stuff I suppose.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Glenn Jennings;n1183201]Just curious How would you guys rate tru-oil versus Minwax tung oil? Is there much difference between the two products or are they very similar?

                    Hi Glenn .Tru-oil is basically linseed oil with a mix of what they call other natural oils and some mineral spirits. Formby’s is a mix of Tung oil and other oils and a varnish. Danish oils are also a tung or lenseed oil mix with other oils and varnish. The mix depends on the maker. With tung oil my preference is the 100% tung oil. I use Waterlox pure tung oil. Becouse I use a little at a time I just buy the small bottle as I need one. Tung oil is more work, you have to let the oil cure well between coats. I just like the deep lust look it gives the wood. I have not used it yet but I have friends who use a Teak and tung oil mix for outdoor use. They tell me they get deeper penatration and more protection into the wood with the same look. Tru-oil is a good product. I have used it on stocks for years. I often use it on plain uncarved canes. I do not us it on carvings becouse I do not seem get a even look to a uneven or textured surfaces.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Randy,
                      Many thanks for that informative piece. Even with tru-oil I generally leave it overnight before re-coating up to about 3 coats then I leave it for 3-4 days before putting another series of 3 coats on. Is slow going but the result ends up reasonably good.

                      I find tru oil a little difficult to get a high gloss finish unless thinned 20% with mineral turpentine and sprayed. If wiped on it tends to streak and doesn't self level that well. I found putting it on like shellac and putting a few drops in a lint free cotton cloth and wiping it on quite vigorously got the best results.But it is so slow. Takes 10-12 coats to get a half decent finish.

                      Thanks Randy Much appreciated.

                      Cheers
                      Glenn

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X