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Oil before paint??

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  • #16
    Squid: Besides the Scotchbrite, consider XXX coarse steel wool. The strands are flat.
    They cut like a million chisels as they glide over your paint on curved surfaces.
    One cured finish coat first to force the fiber to stand up straight.
    Brian T

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    • #17
      I don't know the manufacturer, but what I use is a gray type similar, if not the same as Scotch Brite.
      . . .JoeB

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      • #18
        I think that 3M makes Scotchbrite. The levels of abrasion vary. I know of red, green gray and blue.
        I use green in my kitchen.
        Brian T

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        • #19
          Just found a chart explaining colors:
          White 1500 grit
          Blue 1000 grit
          Lt Grey 800 grit
          Green 600 grit
          Marron 320 grit
          Brown 240 grit
          Dark Gray 150 grit
          . . .JoeB

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          • #20
            Based on joepaulbutler's chart, Green at 600 grit should be okay to remove fuzz. The Green stuff I've used in the past seemed to be much, much coarser than that! I read the grit is actually Aluminum Oxide and not just the fiber size so maybe what I'm remembering is the green fiber matrix to which the abrasive grit is adhered. I'd go with steel wool but it tends to shed fibers and I don't want them floating around the kitchen, also known as my craft shop. I don't know, maybe needle files and sandpaper is really the best way to go.

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            • #21
              The trick to using polyurethane on your carvings is to buy the small cans of satin polyurethane. A new can has very thin polyurethane in it, which soaks into the carving very quickly, except where the paint is really thick. I use a small 1 " cheap brush to flood the entire carving with polyurethane and let it set for about a minute. I then blot away any excess polyurethane on the surface with a clean white paper towel and then let it dry. It gives a matte finish that is easy to clean and maintain, and you can just wash the dust off it. Do not do additional coats or it will get shiny and plastic looking! Only one and then blot it off.
              'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

              http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
              https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
              http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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              • #22
                Very fine steel wool does disintegrate. I don't use it. Junk but for iron acetate stain.
                I use the XXX coarse steel wool which works far better than any sand paper can ever be.

                The 3M fiber is the base to which the grit is bonded, same as sand paper, same as water stones.
                The colors are simply codes to identify grit sizes.
                Brian T

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                • #23
                  Thanks Brian T, I have some of the coarse stuff and will give it a try on a test piece.

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                  • #24
                    Was a professional interior house painter that showed me that trick.

                    The XXX coarse steel wool has flat strands that cut fiber like a million chisels
                    without grinding off the paint.

                    Some woods are a lot worse that others (Douglas-fir in particular.)
                    Lay on the first coat of whatever finish it is and wait until is sets up good and hard.
                    Then a gentle rub with the steel wool to clip off the stand-up fuzz
                    and no more even sanding needed.
                    Brian T

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