Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Using a toothpick to supplement your brushes.......

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Using a toothpick to supplement your brushes.......

    Years ago when I first started carving I use to thin my paints and coat my carvings after painting with an antiquing medium in an attempt to get that aged look to them. The problem I always ran into was during the painting process. If I screwed up and ran two colors together or painted a detail on the carving the wrong color, then really my only option was to use a knife to remove the painted material and try again. The only problem with this is that inevitably the touched up area showed.

    Over the years as I've got less steady with my hands I've shifted to using solid color paints with little or no thinning. This allows do-overs with little or no adverse effects. Mistakes can readily be corrected and are mostly invisible to the casual observer.

    And this is where the use of a toothpick has become part of my finishing repertoire. I use both round toothpicks and flat sided picks. They are perfect for making round eyes, putting polka dots on clothing, getting into very tight spaces, applying thin lines to your project, and making very minute touchups.



    DSC00153.JPG DSC00150.JPG DSC00152.JPG

  • #2
    Good one, Eddy. I also use the end of my paintbrush handles for dots...different handles for different size dots.
    Arthur

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with you Eddy, nothing better when doing that little white accent dot in the corner of eyes. I even have " favorite " toothpicks that I've used multiple times for purposes.
      Wayne
      If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

      Comment


      • #4
        Yep, Eddie, tooth picks are great tools. Nice carving you did and fine polka dots.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the toothpick idea. Much simpler than what I did.

          I have a small collection of ordinary woodworking nails. Some with flat heads, some with very small heads like casing nails and finishing nails. Used a chalked file to get the head shapes and flat surfaces that I wanted.
          Then, stab that part into a lemon for a few days. The corrosion is a little like making iron/vinegar stain. The corroded surface on the nail head picks up any sort of paint, thick or thin, really well.
          Brian T

          Comment


          • #6
            I sure like that carving and the way it is painted, Eddy.
            Herb

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
              Good one, Eddy. I also use the end of my paintbrush handles for dots...different handles for different size dots.
              Arthur...... That's what's great about this forum. Someone always throws an idea out that one might not have thought of before. Today I was trying to think of what I could use for larger circles. Great idea. Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                I like the toothpick idea. Much simpler than what I did.

                I have a small collection of ordinary woodworking nails. Some with flat heads, some with very small heads like casing nails and finishing nails. Used a chalked file to get the head shapes and flat surfaces that I wanted.
                Then, stab that part into a lemon for a few days. The corrosion is a little like making iron/vinegar stain. The corroded surface on the nail head picks up any sort of paint, thick or thin, really well.
                Brian... My wife would shoot me if I wasted a good melon. Seriously though, doesn't the rust on the nail point come out in the paint?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nope. I just rubbed the nail head on my jeans. I think there's enough fine corrosion to mix with the paint. Maybe all I got rid of was the factory grease from the nail-making machinery? I don't know.

                  The neat thing I see about the toothpicks is that you can shape the end so easily.
                  Brian T

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You did a good job getting the dots the same size using a toothpick! I have used q-tips before, but they can leave a little fuzziness to the edge. Nice suggestion, thank you!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Awesome tip, thanks Eddy, I know Ill be giving it a try.
                      Mark N. Akers
                      My Etsy Store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/KarolinaKarver

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for sharing Eddy. Love the bear!

                        A trick I read a while back and tried yesterday is to cut a fine point on the end of the toothpick--in my case, "pointed" end of the flat toothpick--and use it to create the "stitching" on clothing. It really does perk up "blank" areas on a carving. And after yesterday, I also suggest to do a bit at a time and walk away for a while. You'll make less mistakes.

                        stitching detail.jpeg

                        BobL

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Embossing tools are good for this also

                          Embossing tool.JPG

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Totally agree, Eddy. There are even some toothpicks with round bottoms that are perfect for the pupil of the eye. I’ve also learned to shave the toothpicks with a knife to fit inside lines when needed. PS: Your bear is adorable! Love the painting too.
                            Always covered in chips.
                            My Instagram page: @carvingjunkies

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X