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Quick and Dirty Paint Shaker

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  • Quick and Dirty Paint Shaker

    I've been carving and painting for close to 30-years now and some of my paints are as old as the amount of time that I've been carving. In the past when a small 2-OZ bottle of acrylic paint became too thick for my liking I'd add a little distilled water and then shake the living daylights out of it. If it was really gummed up I'd often end up banging my hand against my leg in an attempt to add even more force to the shake. And frankly my friends I'm getting too darn old to smashing body parts together. So the other day I decided to try a new method, one that I'd thought about previously but for whatever reason never got around to working out. I have an ancient Black and Decker Mouse that I bought years ago up at the B&D factory store in Valdosta, GA on one of our trips north. My days of sanding and painting large projects have long since passed so I thought why not try to use it has a paint shaker. In practice it wouldn't be much different than the large commercial shakers used by Home Depot and Lowes. So I dug up a couple of small Velcro straps and using them to attach a 2-OZ bottle of acrylic paint to the sander, gave it a try. My first attempt worked but not as well as I'd hoped. The problem I surmised was that what was on the bottom had no way to mix with what was on the top. So then I turned the bottle over and tried again. This time the results was much more satisfactory except it was still a little thick. Eureka! On my third try, adding a small amount of distilled water, I found success. It was perfect. The only caveat is that don't forget to tighten the bottle cap before turning it upside down and shaking. If you do, I guarantee from personal experience that it won't be pretty! Quick and Dirty Paint Shaker (1) (Medium).JPG

  • #2
    Great idea, Eddie.
    Herb

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    • #3
      Thanks for the idea & the warning, that sound like something I would do
      . . .JoeB

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      • #4
        Thanks for sharing the Idea and your experiences.
        If you don't like to call me wasserretter call me Dirk

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        • #5
          Great idea Eddy!... I've got a couple of Milwaukee palm sanders that have been gathering dust for a while. I think I'll have to dig them out and see if I can gear them up in a similar fashion. I tried something similar using a reciprocating saw a few years back, but it didn't work out so good, so I gave up on it.
          Wayne
          If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

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          • #6
            That's a great idea... very creative thinking!
            I've heard some folks put a nut (as in nut/bolt) in each container to act as a stir, like the bead in a spray can.
            That would really "shake things up"...
            Nice tip!

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            • #7
              I have tons of these paints....one I do not shake it. I take out the needed amount and thin it with water using a brush if it is too thick, on foam paper plates. This way I can control the thickness I need and can easily mix another color to what I want. One thing bad about thinning it in a bottle is the fact you can get it too thin. Another issue is if it is starting to dry in the bottle you will dig up lumps of paint mixed in with your usable paint. Which is a pain in the rear end to fish out. If the bottle is start to dry near the bottom I may add water, but it is a sign of a near-death anyway....time to get a new bottle. Looks like you are working too hard Eddie...smile.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dileon View Post
                I have tons of these paints....one I do not shake it. I take out the needed amount and thin it with water using a brush if it is too thick, on foam paper plates. This way I can control the thickness I need and can easily mix another color to what I want. One thing bad about thinning it in a bottle is the fact you can get it too thin. Another issue is if it is starting to dry in the bottle you will dig up lumps of paint mixed in with your usable paint. Which is a pain in the rear end to fish out. If the bottle is start to dry near the bottom I may add water, but it is a sign of a near-death anyway....time to get a new bottle. Looks like you are working too hard Eddie...smile.
                "O you take the high road, and I'll take the low road,
                And I'll be in Scotland afore ye,"


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Eddy-Smiles View Post

                  "O you take the high road, and I'll take the low road,
                  And I'll be in Scotland afore ye,"

                  Good laugh thanks.....

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