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  • Tung n' Teak oil

    I have not used it for a while. Mostly becouse I have not made any outdoor furniture or plain basic hiking/walking stick for a while. But a custom sailing craft builder told me about this about 30 years ago not long after I move to the gulf coast. It is a Tung and Teak oil mixture. You get the penetration advantage in teak oil and the more protective of the Tung oil. I use the"Crica 1850" brand. Just sharing a alternative finish I had not seen talked about here.
    We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
    https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

  • #2
    It sounds like an interesting product I often add a little tung or BLO to poly to stretch the work and absorption time also allowing the finish time to penetrate deeper into the wood. Danish oil, teak oil and Formby’s tung oil are such misunderstood products.


    From “The Daily Bark”. July 2019

    Teak oil


    Teak oil, strange as it may seem, has nothing to do with the Teak Tree. As with Danish oil, it’s made from a blend of ingredients, namely Linseed oil, pure Tung oil, mineral spirits (petroleum naphtha) and varnish. Petroleum naphtha is derived from petroleum and is used as a thinner for the oil. The reason why Teak oil is called ‘Teak oil’ is purely down to giving the product a purpose, namely being suitable for use on Teak wood, such as Teak garden furniture.

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    • #3
      Good. Not many of my carvings wind up outdoors in the weather. Some Ravens.
      I've done them up with black house paint that appears to weather well.
      I like Randy's suggestion for showing off the wood.

      All the diamond willow canes that I use have had 4 coats of MinWax Tung Oil Protective Finish. That's quite glossy and shows off the fungus and bug wood very nicely. Certainly seems water repellant from melting snow.
      Brian T

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      • #4
        Teak, Danish, and the different brands are all finishing oils. A mix of an oil, thinner and some sort of varnish. over 50 years ago I knew a gunmaker that taught me a method for finishing gunstocks. At least a 1/3 of the tung style finishes are mineral spirits, This sells for a little over $11 a gallon. A gallon of Varnish $40, and Linseed oil of BLO $26, or 3 gallons of mix for $77. A cheaper than the Tru Oil that costs $22 for 8ounces.

        The following is a copy and paste from another forum.

        I was a game call maker. My go to finish for wood is a mix of (1) linseed oil, (2) spar varnish and (3) mineral spirits. The linseed can be switched to tung oil or a mix of them. In west Texas it is rare to find real tung oil, so I used BLO from the paint store.

        These were the high end calls, they got a gunstock type finish, a finish that was equal to a Weatherby or any custom gun maker's final product.

        I made up 2 mixes, one strong on mineral spirits and the second an equal parts of 1, 2 and 3. My first step to a finish was to wipe everything down with a real damp rag. Let those dry thoroughly, then sand with 500 or 600 grit. The apply my first coat, this is an eyeball guess, but equal parts of 1 and 2, and double on the mineral spirits.

        Set it aside on the drying rack and allow 24 hour drying time. 24 hours later, they get another coat of the starter mix, and another 24 hours of drying time. Next day they get another coat of starter mix, but it is applied with using a 600 or 800 grit wet dry sandpaper. And another 24 hours of drying time.

        By now I have 3 coats, and the wood is pretty well sealed inside and out. Depending on the type of game call the rest of the finishing varies.

        My next step might be as simple as one or 2 coats of 1:1:1 mix of the 3 parts applied with a 1000 grit piece of wet dry sandpaper. But it also might mean 5 or more coats of the final mix. It depends on the wood, the design oof the call, whether it is going to a great customer or on the sale rack. Some pieces of wood demand a good deep finish look, others a more muted look. Like a fine gunstock, you get to know when the finish is just right.

        This procedure looks like it takes a long time, it does, and it doesn't. Each coat only takes a few seconds, even with the wet sanding.

        Ther are 2 links that explain all of this in more detail than I did. Firearms Forum Article - A Classic Oil Finish - From: Mark Freburg and Russ's Corner: A WoodCentral Archive

        This is also a copy and paste from another finish comment
        I am a finish junkie. I have bought every finish known to mankind, I have created more conconc0ctions of finishes that is humanly possible. I used to have notebooks with notes on what worked and what did not work. A 12 Step Program for finish junkies is futile. I have been a woodturner since 1961 and a finish junkie for almost as long.

        The end result, in my opinion there is no one perfect finish for everything, and there is no fast, easy and simple finish. Additionally every good finish starts with a good sanding job.

        I recommend a book by Bob Flexner, "Understanding Wood Finishes" also Russ Fairfield's Secrets of Finishes. https://www.woodcentral.com/russ/russ3.shtml

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
          It sounds like an interesting product I often add a little tung or BLO to poly to stretch the work and absorption time also allowing the finish time to penetrate deeper into the wood. Danish oil, teak oil and Formby’s tung oil are such misunderstood products.


          From “The Daily Bark”. July 2019

          Teak oil


          Teak oil, strange as it may seem, has nothing to do with the Teak Tree. As with Danish oil, it’s made from a blend of ingredients, namely Linseed oil, pure Tung oil, mineral spirits (petroleum naphtha) and varnish. Petroleum naphtha is derived from petroleum and is used as a thinner for the oil. The reason why Teak oil is called ‘Teak oil’ is purely down to giving the product a purpose, namely being suitable for use on Teak wood, such as Teak garden furniture.
          I owned a sailboat that had teak trim, and I used teak oil on it regularly. It penetrated immediately and required no removal of excess oil. I imagine that was because of both the composition of the oil and the nature of the wood. Since the boat was moored at a dock it was continuously exposed to the weather and without regular applications of the oil the teak would dry and fade noticeably. The oil certainly kept the teak attractive, but I wonder how much it helped preserve it beyond the natural ability of the teak to endure the elements.
          Arthur

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          • #6
            Teak wood can take a lot of abuse. I served on USS Ticonderoga CVA-14, at the beginning of the Vietnam War. During a shipyard overhaul, portions of the teak planking on the flight deck were replaced. These areas were in the landing areas; takeoff areas by the catapults were all steel because of the jet exhaust.

            Claude
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            • #7
              I worked with a guy from Ghana.
              He said they used teak for telephone poles because nobody would eat it.
              Brian T

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