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  • First Attempt to paint

    Hi my first attempt to paint, never did anything like this before, the difficult that I found that some in same phase the color didn't attach to. The wood especially the pink on the face some one of can say to me why? What are the best acrylic for the wood? Where I can learn some basic technique to paint on the wood? The wood it was prepared with 3 pass of boiled linen wood, thanks
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  • #2
    Hi Carlo: I like painting. After carving I clean the wood under warm water. When it dried completely, I leave one pass of BLO. Then dry again (but it has not to be completely dried) after this, I paint with acrylics, but I thin them with water and make until 5 layers. Afterwards I will let the painting dry, then BOL with a color (oil paint) and a the very last I put a wax on it. This way is surely not the only, but fits (in the moment) for me. Keep on going!!

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    • #3
      Helllo, Carlo. I use a very thin wash of paint on the face and hands. I put one drop of Burnt Sienna and 24 drops of water. The rest of my acrylic paint colors are usually diluted about one drop paint and 4 drops water. Sometimes a second application is needed. If my carving is dirty, I first wash it in the sink with some clear dish soap and water, then let dry completely (sometimes I use a hair dryer to to help it dry quicker). Then I paint, light colors first, dark colors last, letting each color dry before the next color is applied (again, the hair dryer helps). When final paint is dry, I put on a water-based varnish. I find these at the hobby store near the acrylic paint. I don't antique my carvings.

      To prevent the paint from soaking into the end grain of the wood, I will sometimes paint the end grain with the water-based varnish first. This acts as a sealer to prevent the thinned paint from soaking in.
      Claude
      Last edited by Claude; 01-15-2022, 02:48 PM.
      My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
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      • #4
        There is an old saying never put acrylic paint on top of oil, it may pop off or it may not go on some places. Any sealer must be water-based and not gloss. If you are unsure test your paints on a junk piece of wood first. There are various hobby paints I like the ones in the bottles and my favorite is Delta Ceramcoat Acrylics 2 oz, I like their colors are fresher and brighter. They are pre-mixed colors and they have a huge selection and are cheap. Face you use flesh color and if you want it pinker you had a touch of red on a plate. or darker reddish browns added to the flesh color again mixed on a plate or board. Although I do buy the ones from Walmarts. A note you can mix any kind of acrylic paint together without killing the paint.
        . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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        • #5
          I never wash my carvings. I always seal the wood with spray-on Krylon matte, rub with crumpled brown bag paper, then paint. I only thin acrylics (the same kind Di mentioned) if it's gotten too thick to flow very easily. I don't thin them into washes. Another light spray of the matte Krylon, then generally antique with a gel stain, wiping off quickly. Finally I let dry overnight then a top coat of the Krylon. I don't use wax as I think it adds nothing and acts as a dust catcher.

          I doubt that any two of us use the same process, but if it works, that's all that counts...no right or wrong if we get the effect we want and it stays on the wood!
          Arthur

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          • #6
            @Di: Thanks a lot for Your information (no acrylics on oil). I didnot know, and just followed the thing someone else did, in lack of experience.
            Claude and @Arthur: Thank for the detailed information. Next time I will try one of Your methods of painting (Oje, have to carve muuuch to paint them and try everything )

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            • #7
              Hi,
              Always thanks for your information I have some point to begin with.
              Another question do you put something as post to protect the color from accidental scratches?

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              • #8
                I used to rinse before painting with acrylic washes, then dip in boiled linseed oil with a tint of brown. Now I'm experimenting with all oil paints and using refined artists linseed oil. Like a more natural "wood"look.
                Bill
                Living among knives and fire.

                http://www.texaswoodartist.com

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                • #9
                  Lotsa good advise you are getting as you can see there are many approaches to painting, personally I think your paint job looks fine
                  Herb

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                  • #10
                    My club teaches the following:
                    • Dip in BLO - allow that to soak in. Then wipe off any excess. Don't wad up your BLO soaked paper towels. They can combust on their own
                    • Apply several layers of thinned acrylic paint in the desired colors. 1:15 - One drop of paint to 15 of water. With it being watered down the wood just soaks it up. It doesn't sit on top.
                    • To get rosy nose and cheeks - 1:30 of red.
                    • Highlight the shadows with 1:20 of burnt umber
                    • Let this dry a day or so
                    • Apply about 3 coats of satin lacquer (Deft)
                    • Once this is dry follow up with Feed 'n Wax.
                    • Let the Feed 'n Wax dry and buff with a clean shoe brush.
                    Last edited by PHolder; 01-19-2022, 07:34 AM.
                    https://www.triadwoodcarvers.com/

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                    • #11
                      I spray finish on top of acrylics ....it will hold down almost anything I use, pastels, make-up, color pencils on top of my paint. I use various spray Deft lacquers and various other spray finishes on top of my painted wood the six years. I use matte mod podge which is glue-based also makes a real nice clear sealer. I do not wax the lacquer unless I want a pro shine to show off beautiful wood grains..and I always use the beeswax method with power polishers that are used mostly for turning bowls..
                      . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                      • #12
                        Thanks everyone for the amount of info shared love you

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                        • #13
                          I use Dawn dish soap to scrub down my carving before painting. Just take to get all the soap raised off. I then throw the carving in the microwave giving a 30sec blast. keep doing that until I'm satisfied the wood is dry. I make some power buffers made from 3M Scotch-Brite Scuff Pads. that I mount on a mandrel and use in a power handpiece or use some 320 grit sandpaper to smooth out the raised grain from washing. For the most part, I paint right out of the cap of the acrylic bottle, just before painting a color, I will use my brush and paint the areas to be painted with water, and while is damp paint the color.

                          . The fabric comes in different grits:
                          3M Scotch Brite Nylon Pads:
                          7445 - White pad, called Light Duty Cleansing - (1000) 1200-1500 grit
                          7448 - Light Grey, called Ultra Fine Hand - (600-800) 800 grit.
                          6448 - Green (?), called Light Duty Hand Pad - (600) 600 grit
                          7447 - Maroon pad, called General Purpose Hand - (320-400) 320 grit
                          6444 - Brown pad, called Extra Duty Hand - (280-320) 240 grit
                          7446 - Dark Grey pad, called Blending Pad (180-220) 150 grit
                          7440 - Tan pad, called Heavy Duty Hand Pad - (120-150) 60(?)
                          Blue Scotch-Brite is considered to be about 1000 grit.
                          (The value inside the parentheses is directly from 3M.)

                          Just some different arrows for your quiver
                          . . .JoeB

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