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How to kill your paint brushes.

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  • #46
    Re: How to kill your paint brushes.

    I do not know to many people use oil paints....because they take very long times to dry before painting on them again. Plus I hear people complain about cleaning them with the Turpentine, and the smell. It never bother me....but you know how people complain....smile. They are the best kind of paint because of color in my opinion. Oil painting is a rare bird these days....so when I talk about painting anything.....I know they are talking about acrylics. Although there are water based oils,....that is one thing I know zero about. I like the old fashion long proof it works centuries....kind of paint. I have some oil paints from my grandfather....which is proof they last forever in the tube, most of the time. So I always tell anyone new ....do acrylic to learn and then you can branch out to the other kinds of paint.

    And it been about 30 years since I touched the air brush....can not remember how in the heck I cleaned them. LOL.

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    • #47
      Re: How to kill your paint brushes.

      I needed airbrush for some theatrical stagecraft. That went well. Then there was a demand for fantasy, etc., makeup. That was really fun to do, both party/Hallowe\'en and stagecraft. The glitter of stainless steel paint is a sight to behold.
      Brian T

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      • #48
        Just reminder......watch You Tube if your beginner...also tons of information on the internet.....do searches and you will find a lots of information.

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        • #49
          I want to also recommend Lynn Doughty, Out West Woodcarving, – Lynn Doughty is another caricature carver nationally known for his blog, Out West Woodcarving and his distinctive style of carving western caricatures. Lynn provides a vast library of project videos for free over 400 hundred I think now...... Lynn teaches people painting as well as carving. Outstanding examples.

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          • #50
            Ok ..... few new ones.... I do not do this,.....but alot of people admitted they did........Don't Suck The Brush To Point It, Or Ever Chew On any Art Brushes. Ever, Ever, Ever, Even If It Seems To Work So Well.

            Spit seems to hold the shape of a watercolor round better than anything and sucking it pulls it right into shape like it was new, it even dries like that. I have used spit but I have not sucked on the brush.....it does make a good point.....LOL The problem with this isn't a risk to the brush. It's the risk to you, the human being poisoning yourself with toxic pigments.

            They can kill you over time and cause brain damage along the way and do all sorts of horrible things. It's not dangerous to use them if you never get them in your mouth and mucous membranes..

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            • #51
              I can not tell you how many times I have done this with my brushes.....but it will destroy a brush....this is a major no, no. Don't Use Brushes To Apply Glue Or Varnish Or Gesso Or Sanded Primers and MOD Podge Paint that needs special cleaner and you do not have it....

              There's a reason Hobby stores has those cheap foam end brushes that look like kiddie toys. They rock for priming paper with sanded pastel grounds or varnishing oil paintings or a thousand other uses where you need a smooth flat application. Do not use your one and only good brush flat for it . Glue can include things like wood glue, Elmers, superglue, epoxy, or the weird hide glues and mediums needed for gold leafing.

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              • #52
                I will include this one because it is very comical....smile.

                Oh, and one more thing.

                Don't clip your cat's tail to make a brush, or his whiskers. The cat doesn't like it and brushes are much easier and cheaper to come by than they were back in the day when a particular famous fine artist did that because he couldn't find the brush he wanted. You can get any kind of brush now from hake to Chinese pony or wolf or rabbit or Kolinsky sable or good synthetics to emulate any of these, so you don't need to denude your poor cat for your artistic growth.

                It also helps to convince him that his tail isn't his brush either and he shouldn't dip it in the pot of wash and lay a 3" wide stroke across everything you've done. Some of the painting cats do actually use tail strokes occasionally, but that's his responsibility. At least until it's time to help him clean up afterward, it is.

                And don't clean brushes by swiping them across the cat's back even if you're using nontoxic food coloring and that's a white cat, and even if it'd be funny. That's just cruel, and a good way to get pranked back by getting scarified in colorful and interesting feline designs.

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                • #53
                  Another fact is when you wash the brush, you must gently shape it back to the way it was with your fingers. If it is damaged it will not go back to shape, then the brush goes into the junk brush box for other usages. One thing you do not do is pull stray hairs out of the brush, you cut them near the feral. I will also note if you buy outside the recommendation, ...you often get brushes that shed hairs onto your painted surface...these brushes have to go into the trash can as they were not made right.
                  Last edited by Dileon; 09-15-2020, 11:22 AM.

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                  • #54
                    It is now ten years later. Where to buy brushes? The good brushes.. often from Micheals online. But today Amazon is often my go-to place. My expensive brushes will last a lifetime if taken care of, but you do not need them unless you are going to go professional. One kind brush I love and buy often is packs of brushes....they do not last long times of lots of painting but they do not cost 30 dollars a brush. At Amazon around 15 dollars for the pack. The reason is not too soft and not too stiff they spread paint pretty good...in my own opinion and plus I am always looking for new short handle liners...and trying them out. Amazon has tons of micro brushes, liners of all kinds most I have never seen but cheap enough to worth the risks of buys just watch for the star rating. 61uPWQYOa6L._AC_SL1000_.jpg
                    Last edited by Dileon; 09-15-2020, 12:32 PM.

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                    • #55
                      I buy these junk brushes...basically knowing they do not last, often used for one-time usage with finishes, glue-based such as Mod Podge sealers, base paints, and etc... for nine dollars they get used more often than not.

                      I do note those big round brushes...never use them as they put on too much paint. I am a sticker for wasted painted and too thick paint on a surface and these brushes are great for plastering paint on a surface. I say paint thin, and let it dry if not enough to do another coat. My opinion is I do not want those streaks of heavy paint. It is noted beginners in painting 3D objects do this... they want to put paint on fast, heavy and one coat...that is a no, no ... you are not painting the barn. Also want to note Mark uses round brushes for his work and his carving are painted perfect....so there are no hard firm rules, we each have our favorite methods.
                      71jHjrxdCdL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
                      Last edited by Dileon; 09-15-2020, 04:16 PM.

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                      • #56
                        It happens your in the middle of a painting and the phone rings, by the time come back there will be dried disaster waiting. Plus people who never learn in fact I know a few professional artists in their studios, their paintbrushsbrushes-jackson-civic-art.png look like this.....they are big spenders in art brushes over the years.

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                        • #57
                          I always have two water cans on the paint bench. One is clean water for mixing paints,the other is the wash can for washing brushes. Any kind of a delay and the brush sits in the wash can.

                          The best trick, I can't recall who taught me, is to presoak your acrylic and water color brushes in clean water for 5-10 minutes before you paint. This lets water get up inside the ferrule so that paint won't soak up there and harden the flexibility of the brush.
                          Brian T

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                          • #58
                            Looking back at the names over the ten year life of this thread...too many have dropped by the wayside, no doubt most when "the disaster" struck the forum. What a shame.
                            Arthur

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
                              Looking back at the names over the ten-year life of this thread...too many have dropped by the wayside, no doubt most when "the disaster" struck the forum. What a shame.
                              The forum was super busy, lots of people, and tons of old pictures. It was the winter of Feb 2014 the site was hacked, good enough that it took over two years to get up and running sort of?? plus major work by IT people. We lost a lot of people then who tried to hang in there and gave up. The hard part of all pictures from that time is mostly lost in space and gone. We had to start over and hope she would not die a hard death. Here we are still building it... the few that never gave up.

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                              • #60
                                Yes, Di, while the loss of members was unfortunate, the loss of the pictures was worse. But I wonder why so many folks who threw in the towel haven't checked back over time and returned. I look at the activity level now and it's a shadow of what it once was. Without counting noses, I'd guess that there aren't two dozen who regularly post now.

                                The posted number of members is 248, but most of those must be lurkers, which is fine if they gain something by just looking, but it would be nice to have more experienced carvers posting.
                                Last edited by Arthur C.; 09-16-2020, 07:10 AM.
                                Arthur

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