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  • #16
    Looks more like turning chisels to me. And pretty poor at that. Save your money.
    Every day should be unwrapped like a precious gift.

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    • #17
      I think if you are looking for a set of carving tools with decent steel for not much money, you are far better off with one of the Master Carver sets. You can get a 10 tool set for $100 and they are actual shapes of carving tools. Some of those in the Rutlands set are not. The Master Carvers are a little rough on fit and finish, but it's the steel that matters and they are good in that department. They are the peers of most of the European brands in the steel department. There are a few carvers in this forum very happy with the Master Carver tools.

      Also I should add that the Master Carver sets don't duplicate tools, so if you buy more than one set you are getting different tools. And I know some decry sets, but how do you know what you will use a lot until you have some tools to choose from? Put another way you don't start out with a single 3-12 and have an epiphany one day that you need an 8-16. You get to that point by having a variety of tools already.

      http://www.mastercarver.com/category...all-tool-sets/
      Last edited by fiddlesticks; 08-17-2016, 10:34 PM. Reason: Forgot the link

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      • #18
        Well I hummed and hawed about what to buy. I nearly bought Narex but in the end common sense prevailed I went for Pfeil. I've ordered 3 to begin with and I'll add as I go. Thanks for all the input.

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        • #19
          You will not be sorry later with the Pfeil purchase. Good tools.
          Carve On,
          Kadiddle

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          • #20
            All is well. You did the right thing to buy a few tools from open stock. You don't and won't need one of everything.
            Use them, learn to hold them "carving sharp" ,and buy another one when you realize that what you have can't do what's needed.

            Would not be too poor if some other companies were willing to run their qualities up against Pfeil.
            Brian T

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            • #21
              One advantage of the approach you have taken is that you will start out with an experience of what "carving sharp" means. This is what you will eventually expect from all of your tools and how other brands should perform after you go through the sharpening process. Pay attention, because this is an important source of woodcarving satisfaction.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by pallin View Post
                One advantage of the approach you have taken is that you will start out with an experience of what "carving sharp" means. This is what you will eventually expect from all of your tools and how other brands should perform after you go through the sharpening process. Pay attention, because this is an important source of woodcarving satisfaction.
                Absolutely, and I have already experienced it with my knives. That is where I was struggling with the cheap set of club gouges, they just would not sharpen enough nor would they hold their edge. Looking forward to getting my hands on some Swiss steel.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by mdallensr View Post
                  I took a two-week course from Chris Pye up in Maine, and his advice was to use the largest gouge or chisel that worked. Why make 2 or 3 cuts when you can get it done with one? And you do have better control of a large tool that a smaller one. I'm going to chance offending a few carvers, but if you buy a set of gouges and never use most of them, it's not the tools fault. You have to take the time to practice with each tool and learn to use it. You need to show yourself what that tool is capable of doing. The tool manufacturers don't make sets out of the least used tools, they're the most commonly used. And, when you buy a set of tools, they're half the price of individually purchased tools. When I need a new carving tool, I need it now, not next week. My nearest Woodcraft is 60 miles away, and I'm not going to stop what I'm carving and spend 3 hours and half a tank of gas to buy one tool that I need now. Maybe other carvers plan better than I do, but how do you know you need a new tool until you realize you don't have THE tool you need? OTOH, if you're a caricature carver, you don't need a set of anything, so your choice of tools must match your carving style and subjects. When you see pictures of the pro carver's shops, you see a bunch of gouges and chisels, and they use a lot of them. Mike
                  I totally agree with Chris on using the largest tool that will do the job. Most beginning carvers buy tools that are too small, and handicap themselves with them.

                  I absolutely do not agree about getting tools less expensively in sets. Pfeil sets sometimes actually cost more than individual tools, to cover the cost of the box. In North America, we assume that a set will be less expensive, but the Swiss do not think like this. Maybe some brands of tools are less expensive when purchased in sets, but not Pfeil.

                  I have seen sets that consist of 3 or 4 chisels - a straight chisel, a skew chisel and a short bent chisel, then a badly shaped V tool, a gouge or two that are practically identical, and a goose necked chisel which is an utter abomination for most carvers and has only one application that I can think of - cleaning up the bottom of a blind mortise (how often have you needed to do THAT on a carving!). Some manufacturers have no clue at all about what should be in a set. None know what YOU will be carving. Buy tools that you will use, and only a couple or a few at a time, and come up with a selection that work for you.

                  Skip the 180 mile drive. It is possible to order good tools (Pfeil) from reputable dealers, and have them mailed to your address. Check it out. You will be pleasantly surprised.

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