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Sanding drum failure on Dremel

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  • Sanding drum failure on Dremel

    I use my Dremel type tool quite a bit when making clutching crosses to tidy up after the initial knife job. I bought some new drums off ebay, from China of course, and the first two blew out in my face. Not pleasant. Don't know if anyone can recommend an alternative supplier?

  • #2
    Dremel, what I've alway used--?????
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3

      Get a full mask before you do some harm.
      Might be the speed and the after-market stuff can't take the G-forces?

      Was a spell when I was carving the 3/4" heads of 8" steel nails to make branding irons for carvings.
      Bought several pkgs aftermarket cutoff discs. Either I ground them down to a nub in no time or they exploded in my face (full mask).

      Decided to go back to the original Dremel brand. Same cut but lasted 3-4 times as long and never broke.
      Obviously thicker but the adhesive must be able to take the heat better at 15k rpm.
      Brian T

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      • #4
        Typically I have some after-market ones on order from E-Bay, hoping these will be better. To be honest I've never had a problem with the after market ones before, but if this second lot misbehave then it's Dremel only from then on.

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        • #5
          My guess would that almost all of the Dremel accessories come from China, even the ones with the Dremel brand. I order all of my Dremel supplies from Widget Supply, good prices and free shipping when you order $35 or more. https://www.widgetsupply.com/

          When carving with the sanding drum, I feel like a slower speed will cut more wood faster than having the drum at maximum speed. I know that on a lathe sanding at a slower speed is more efficient and I feel the same about carving with a sanding drum. My only problem with sanding drums is when they get old, the glue tends to become brittle and let the bands come apart. I had the same problem with sanding belts, and the manufacturer told me that when they get old the glue tends to break loose.

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          • #6
            I buy sanding drums by the pack in 50s by the 100s super cheap and pretty sure that they come from China,.....and these ones will occasionally burst and go flying. Just need to be aware and like they say if your not a fast ducker,... you need to wear a mask. I note when they are starting to peel....you know in a short time they are going to pop you in the face....that is when I take the drum off the mandrel and use a new one. . The alternative is dremel ones....they are better made, of coarse they are a lot more expensive.

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            • #7
              www.mytoolstore.com carries a good selection of Dremel parts and accessories.
              Keep On Carvin'
              Bob K.

              My Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/rwkwoodcarving


              My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


              My RWK Woodcarving Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwkwood


              My Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/rwkoz51/

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              • #8
                sanding drums.jpg
                These are the ones that fall apart...about 7 dollars a bag on Amazon

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                • #9
                  Sorry about the gaint pic.....do not know how that one happened.

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                  • #10
                    Here is a thought, you may be running at to high a operating speed. I run mine at the 1/2 speed notch on Dremel or about 15/17,000 rpm on my Ram unit. I have found out if you run them too fast it melts the glue that holds them together. Also the eccentrically force spins them off.
                    Charlie Wolfe [email protected]
                    Website:
                    http://charleswolfe.weebly.com/

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                    • #11
                      Yeah I wondered about speed as well, although once again others I have used have had no problem running at full pelt. I just wasn't happy with the things, there was an inconsistency with sizes so after two blow outs the lot went in the bin!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob K. View Post
                        www.mytoolstore.com carries a good selection of Dremel parts and accessories.
                        Trouble is Bob in in the UK, by the time I pay shipping etc I may as well buy Dremel.

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                        • #13
                          I know heavy usage will cause them to burst due to speed....but I never have had trouble with most sanding drums for example dremel brand....., just think these are not made so well. They seem to split at the sides easy. After the tenth one flys you know it is not the speed......but the make of the drum.

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                          • #14
                            Lol.... They say that you get what you pay for. With all due respect, not all the stuff coming out of China is worth what you pay for it. When I first got into carving I started out the same route as you using the sanding drums. I still have some. The drums work great but the sandpaper wheels work only hit and miss depending on how they were made and how long they've been in storage. I used to buy mine at the Sweetwater, Tennessee Flea Market and I'd get a fist full for a $1.00. Sounds like a good deal until you go to use them.

                            Then I looked around Smokey Mountain Woodcarvers one day and discovered the Cushioned Drum Sanders that used replaceable sandpaper. They sell the Swiss Paper by the roll in an assortment of grits. I can tell you that one roll lasts a very long time. I highly recommend them. I've got one of every size and duplicates of a couple of them. The cushioned rubber can be replaced. They will sell you the pieces or you can just go down to a craft store and purchase a sheet of black foam rubber and cut it to size. The only thing that you have to watch out for is exceeding the RPM capability of the tool. Run it above the recommended RPM and it turns into a pretzel. Now how would I know that!

                            Smoky Mountain Woodcarvers Cushioned Sander.JPG

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                            • #15
                              That looks great Eddy, I'll see if there's anything like it available UK-wise.

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