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    Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    I just re-read the whole thread. What a hoot. As Pallin says, this is an oldie but a goodie.

    In the last 7-10(?) years I have pretty much abandoned the mallet and gouges for the adzes and crooked knives of the PacNW First Nations style carving tools. I feel like such a beginner that I practice on wood before I carve. I don't regret the switch, it just sort of happened.

    I'm working on several story poles. Very tedious but I lose all sense and track of time.
    I quit when I sense that I need to come up for air.
    Left hand is cramping very badly, nearly made me quit yesterday. Bad news.

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  • pallin
    Senior Member - Ventura

  • pallin
    replied
    This is an old discussion, but I highly recommend it to new WCI members (and lurkers) as well as "long timers." It covers the collected experience of many woodcarvers regarding tools and tool maintenance. They have been very candid about mistakes in what tools they bought, and the overdue awareness of what those tools can do in their present carving projects.

    Take a few minutes. Go back thru these responses. You may discover some new insights.

    Leave a comment:

  • Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    Long bent, short bent, spoon bent and tracery bent. How true. Buy edges from open stock as you need them.
    Time passes and you realize that you do, in fact, own a much needed edge. . . . once a year or so. For me, it's the #12 Vee.

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  • Arthur C.
    Senior Member Louisiana

  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
    My biggest mistakes were dogleg spoon gouges and a macaroni gouge. Had to have 'em, never use 'em. Phil hit the nail on the head when he mentioned learning to use your commonly used tools with different techniques to make them "multitask," if you will.
    Hmmm, quoting myself here...Regarding the "mistakes" mentioned above, I now confess that I used both the doglegs and the macaroni yesterday, for the first time on a project. I could have gotten by without the macaroni, to be sure, but a deep, confined space really did ask for the doglegs. Another reason to never say never!

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  • Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    Carving sharp edges make for glassy smooth chips and shavings. Part of the visual appeal of the process for me.

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  • pallin
    Senior Member - Ventura

  • pallin
    replied
    I like to carve with muscle power, that is, just the force of my hand, arms, and upper body. And, I work mostly in basswood. So, I find I can push gouges up to 25mm (one inch) wide through the wood. I'm not after rapid production. But I still use only a few tools for any given project. This is a #2-20mm:

    reflect 010.jpg

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  • fiddlesticks
    Senior Member

  • fiddlesticks
    replied
    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
    I'm too old to be embarassed. It's dang near funny now. Oh but I needed that skew and the Brienz knife so badly.
    You want to know why? I watched carvers using what I thought were those tools. I didn't watch closely enough.
    .
    I had one of the Ablegglen knives. It looked useful but I could get onto it and being used to using full size tools I wanted tend to use both hands and there are lots of places on that tool you don't want your fingers.

    To answer the OP. I think I can use all of my tools effectively but I find effectively is a journey not a destination. What qualified as effective six months ago isn't as good as effective is now. Sharpening is a bit like that too, but I paid my dues early and was able to sharpen in about a month. My teacher was very traditional, you had to learn to sharpen before he'd teach you to carve. That puts some off, and I can understand that, but I'm the type of person would have flourished in the traditional apprentice role where had to do a bunch of drudgery to prove you were serious before the master would teach you. If I want something I'll put in the work to achieve it. Now I'm sharpening with different methods and refining them to get sharper faster.

    I'm in the midst to adding some new tools to my arsenal. I'll be giving a full report later; they are a bit of a departure from the full size tools I normally use. I've seen them asked about here before, but no one is using them from what I've seen

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  • Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    The sets try to be all things to all people. They include carving edges that you will probably never use.
    If I bought the same set, likely some other tool that I'll never use that you use daily.
    I have a 12/2 and a 12/8 (60* V-shapes), I use them maybe once every year or two.

    I can say that I have actually laid my hands on the biggest Pfeil carving tool set.
    It really is impressive. I had the money for a 5/35 and went home.

    I still think it's a great savings to buy a recommended group of tools from open stock.
    Then some day, you discover that you want to do bigger but in a shape that you already use.
    Mine was a jump from an 8/7 to a 9/15. Needed a much bigger mallet as well. Didn't think of that part.

    Let experience be part of your judgement. The whole "what do I want" and "what do I really need" is kind of fuzzy.

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  • kiri
    Senior Member

  • kiri
    replied
    Having said that, actually I wouldn't mind a full set of Pfeil Carving Set for myself

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  • Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    Purdy is something else but they go 'bang!' like all the others. Guernini engraving has to be seen to be believed.
    See if you get lucky some day and make it into your local Cabela's "Gun Vault."

    If I had to pick a couple of wood carving tools that I absolutley enjoy using, they would be ones that I've put together myself.
    The Kestrel D adze, all I did was buy the blade. My 2-handed planer knife was a Mora #188 farrier's hoof knife.
    Any old worn Hall farrier's knife ($5.00) with a fresh 12 degree edge in the original handle. Maybe Dremel off some of the hook.

    Leave a comment:

  • pallin
    Senior Member - Ventura

  • pallin
    replied
    Oh my! What have I started?

    Leave a comment:

  • tbox61
    Bob Dole Country

  • tbox61
    replied
    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
    I suffered from SAS (shotgun aquisition syndrome). Good reliable field guns. No Purdys.
    I was waxing lyrical about a really sweet s/s Russian 20 ga.
    My partner says: "You mean that we're talking about another shotgun that I've never seen?"
    She should talk. I "lent" her a few and the witch won't give them back..
    Robson Valley...I too am afflicted with SAS...my latest being a Vintage 1979 Weatherby Olympian O/U 12 ga. I use for upland hunting here in KS.

    Funny you mention the Purdey name. 2 years ago, my wife and I took a trip to London. We took a private guided tour around London, and I specifically asked to go to Purdey's...at any rate, we stopped, and had my picture taken in front of 12 bespoke Purdey's with a retail value of $2,200,000!

    I got to hold the gun of my dreams...a 28", 28 gauge over/under which was ONLY $262,000 US dollars! I guess a guy can dream!!!

    Leave a comment:

  • Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    I suffered from SAS (shotgun aquisition syndrome). Good reliable field guns. No Purdys.
    I was waxing lyrical about a really sweet s/s Russian 20 ga.
    My partner says: "You mean that we're talking about another shotgun that I've never seen?"
    She should talk. I "lent" her a few and the witch won't give them back.

    From a dozen, I've slimmed down to 2. One that's gone, a Brazilian Boito coach gun, I really regret selling.

    I just finished a wood carving tool inventory, last one was in 2012. Two pages now.
    I might be done. I think I have the variety of sweeps and sizes for what I like to do.
    If not, I'm pretty sure I can make do.

    What have I got? A couple of big and little. Odd numbered sweeps from 1 - 12. 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12.
    Every PacNW bladesmith has a different numbering syste,

    There's a 34lb and a 22lb block of Brazilian soapstone outside my basement door.
    As luck would have it, I've got the tools.

    Leave a comment:

  • kiri
    Senior Member

  • kiri
    replied

    If you played Piano, there is PAS = Piano Acquisition Syndrome
    If you played Guitar, there is GAS = Guitar Acquisition Syndrome
    No one can avoid or win these syndromes unless they are wood spirits

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  • Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    TAS = Tool Aquisition Syndrome. No known cure unless you took up playing piano.

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