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Recommended Book or Video on Sharpening?

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  • #16
    Yes, Pallin, it boils down to the matter of practice to get good at it, like playing the piano.
    I sure messed up a lot of times beyond what I was taught. Not in books.
    The OP has to pick a method (Tormek? Freehand?) for the fun to begin.

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    • #17
      I really don't feel that anyone can truly teach you how you should sharpen, other than giving you a basic jumping off point. I feel we all hold our tools in a slightly different way &/or angle, so would require a different sharpening technique, specific to each of us & the way we hold things & use them. As in most everything else, I believe experience to be the best teacher here. But, if I was going to let someone else teach me, I think I'd get "Sharpening Simplified by Everett Ellenwood" also, as he REALLY seems to know his stuff. And, I would NEVER send my stuff away to have someone else sharpen. It's a totally unnecessary expense, & I just feel everyone should learn to sharpen their own stuff in their own way. It's actually kind of meditative once you're comfortable doing it. At least to me it is. And kind of fascinating & interesting too. Happy whittlin' to ya'

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      • #18
        Look no further than

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        • #19
          I have yet to read a commercial author, Leonard Lee included, who reveals the most useful of "tricks" to make edges carving sharp.

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          • #20
            In reference to Robson Valley's post above, as a relatively new carver, I continue to look for additional information about getting that "razor sharp edge" everyone references. I, too, have wondered what the final steps are to get to that magical point. Admittedly, the "practice, practice, practice" advise has been helpful. My sharpening skills have improved, however, any advice anyone has to achieve that magical point would be helpful. Robson Valley, I would like to hear more from you on this issue. Thanks to everyone in advance.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by bwj View Post
              In reference to Robson Valley's post above, as a relatively new carver, I continue to look for additional information about getting that "razor sharp edge" everyone references. I, too, have wondered what the final steps are to get to that magical point. Admittedly, the "practice, practice, practice" advise has been helpful. My sharpening skills have improved, however, any advice anyone has to achieve that magical point would be helpful. Robson Valley, I would like to hear more from you on this issue. Thanks to everyone in advance.
              Actually it is try different things until you find what works for you.....this takes time ....it take more patience because it is a major learning curve. For me I think, it was spending the time....to do it...strop and care of tools is must do....other wise they do not maintain an edge. I live in the tropics.....salt and humidity are wicked and leave the chisel on the bench one day ,....will make it start to rust. I want instant satisfaction.....LOL and that does not happen much with wood carving. My hands and my fingers and my wrist is major damaged by arthritis......finding methods that work for me is not easy. But the will to learn and do it no matter how hard it is .....keeps me going. I would love magical works in my tools....but honestly it is wishful thinking, and more on the part of maintenance and care and some elbow grease. AS the old saying.....Be Patience it will come.

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              • #22
                Here in Louisiana, we have the high humidity also. Probably some salt in the air as well, since I'm around 3-4 miles from Lake Pontchartrain. I work and store my tools in my garage, which is often open all day as I work. To prevent (or at least slow down...) the rust, I throw some of the little silica gel packets into the case where I store my tools. These are the little packets that come in medicine bottles and in packages in the mail. After a year or two, I put the packets in the microwave for a few seconds to dry them out, then back into the tool box.

                Claude
                My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/beadman1

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                My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                • #23
                  I use the little packets that come in the shoe boxes. With 3 daughters I have them in every compartment of every box. As far as the sharpening goes, well Everett does an excellent job explaining the steps. Practice, repeat, etc.
                  Carve On
                  Kadiddle

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Tinwood View Post
                    Look up "Sharpening Simplified by Everett Ellenwood". He's the 'professor of sharpening'. He has books, dvd's and YouTube tutorials.

                    Tinwood
                    I agree. Everett has a wonderful video. The book is good to but for purely sharpening I give the nod to the the video.

                    For videos that are free, I think Mary's are about the best
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5iEhUoSi8Q curved gouge

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nu3kguxHKTA vtool

                    Everett's video is well worth the price. He goes into how to use oil stones, diamond stones, sandpaper and water stones. If you can spend
                    Last edited by fiddlesticks; Yesterday, 11:51 PM.

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