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Band saw substitute?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post
    Could take the piece to the local high school wood shop and have them cut it, for a small donation to their pizza fund. I've taken very large pieces for the business to a local HS and they did an excellent job and the shop teacher was glad to give the students something "different." FYI
    "Local" high schools, such as the school one of my daughters attended in the past, "Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School", are now fortresses.

    I suppose I'd need to call first and ask for the "shop" teacher, if any, to return my call.

    Thanks for the idea!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Mike Ross View Post

      "Local" high schools, such as the school one of my daughters attended in the past, "Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School", are now fortresses.

      I suppose I'd need to call first and ask for the "shop" teacher, if any, to return my call.

      Thanks for the idea!
      Sad sign of the times. You might also consider Vocation Tech schools/colleges.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #18
        Spend some time at the local arts and crafts show, get to know other local craftsmen and share your talents and tools.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by dogcatcher View Post
          Spend some time at the local arts and crafts show, get to know other local craftsmen and share your talents and tools.
          Interesting that you mentioned that - I've been to the town's yearly arts and crafts fairs and I recall no artisan showing woodcarved items. PVC, metal, glass, and other materials, but no woodcarved items.
          I've noticed the license plates of their trailers - they're from everywhere else but locally.- they're like Gypsy nomads.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post

            Sad sign of the times. You might also consider Vocation Tech schools/colleges.
            Ah, yes, that's a good idea, thanks - there's one of those in a nearby town.

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            • #21
              Might see if you could take a class in woodworking or "Shop Tools" and have access and training on several other tools as well. They might be a source of scrap wood to carve. When I taught Electronics for 10 years in the high school, the shop teacher (wood) we had metal also was given a ton or so of half burnt heavy (2-6" beams) from a Bar that burned. The Chem teacher owned the bar and knew the shop teacher for more than 20 years - he retired with a dandy oak pool table, making it after school and teaching techniques to his classes. Both have passed buy not in my mind. Martin

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              • #22
                I always wanted to build one of these.
                https://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/..._12%22_Bow_Saw

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                • #23
                  I wanted to make a large one for tree work and such. I have a Steel band-saw that can supply lengths of steel cutting teeth (hard tough wood) and a wood band-saw with a kink in a blade so the blade is near perfect and could supply several nice wood cutting blades with HSS teeth. I have an old and older coping saw. I have some steel cutting blades for them and then I got a Jewelry (Fret?) saw with fine blades. I simply need to make the big one for larger chunks. I like the frames on these saws. Cut many a metal chassis and a few machine / man made parts. Such as a J shaped connector with holes in the ends. Thanks for the link.

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                  • #24
                    I spoke recently with a very accomplished carver of sculpture (in the round) and relief carving. He stated lots of folks asked him why he didn't use a router or band saw to get rid of the bulk of the waste wood. He said he didn't because he wanted to do the waste wood removal by hand so he could learn that particular piece of wood so that when he was making critical cuts he had a good feeling for what to expect. That made a lot of sense to me.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by fiddlesticks View Post
                      I spoke recently with a very accomplished carver of sculpture (in the round) and relief carving. He stated lots of folks asked him why he didn't use a router or band saw to get rid of the bulk of the waste wood. He said he didn't because he wanted to do the waste wood removal by hand so he could learn that particular piece of wood so that when he was making critical cuts he had a good feeling for what to expect. That made a lot of sense to me.
                      I've never seen that in words before but it's true. I've done the rough with an elbow adze and a D adze and pencilled in arrows on the wood for grain.
                      Most of my wood is split not sawn and the puzzle is to figure out which end was up in the log.
                      Brian T

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                      • #26
                        Robson, sometime, maybe in another thread, could you post photos of the various adze(es) you use and what they are called and the typical use for them. I have very limited understanding of their use and imagine others may benefit too.

                        Thanks.

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                        • #27
                          I buy my adze blades from these guys in Washington. They have patterns to follow as guides for the handles.
                          Their pictures are a whole lot better than mine but I'll try to link one.
                          All you really need to figure out is the diameter so the handle fits you.



                          Northwest Coast hand carving tools, adzes, crooked knives, sculptors supplies
                          Brian T

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                          • #28
                            OK. See if I can show you some PacNW adzes. A band saw on a stick.

                            AdzesB.JPG
                            Brian T

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                            • #29
                              Had a farrier bash out a copper blade from 2" x 6" x 1/4" copper bar.
                              The snail carved in the D adze shows you how fast I carve.

                              CopperDAdzeB.JPG
                              Brian T

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                              • #30
                                RV - I'm intrigued about your D-adzes - that the bevels are on the side toward the handle. It looks like it would be difficult to work the bevel on a flat stone or cardboard w/compound. How are you using the D adze with copper blade? Bark removal?

                                The reason I ask goes back to a class I had in Campbell River, B.C. from a First Nations instructor. The left photo below shows his tools. The blade for the elbow adze was made from a piece of leaf spring, curved and beveled on the outside. The haft was a forked branch of Pacific Yew. The right photo is the adze in use on a block of Western Red Cedar.

                                PNWtools.jpgPNWadze.jpg

                                Last edited by pallin; 08-26-2018, 08:55 PM. Reason: added comment & photos

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