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Needed a new knife like I needed a cut thumb

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  • Needed a new knife like I needed a cut thumb

    While finishing my last carving, I got to thinking (dangerous I know) I would like a knife that would make clean up a little easier.
    I got in my knife making drawer and found what I believe is a scraper blade, brand/maker unknown. It is 4" long X1/2" wide & 0.0165" thick.
    I used the entire blade to make the knife of 1-3/8", rest is in the handle. The blade will flex sideways ±1/2", which what I wanted, a lot of flex. The shapes will (i'm thinking) will allow me to make a longer slice will bend my wrist. It seems to cut on my wood sharpening scrape blocks.

    C&C welcome
    . . .JoeB

  • #2

    Joe, last year I bought my first new knife in years. I think all of us woodcarvers suffer under the delusion of needing another knife. I bought the new one for the same reason you mentioned ~ flexibility. Are you planning on using both edges. I had a machete years ago and found that sharpening the "back side" of the blade gave me more options.

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    • #3
      Joe,

      Neat looking knife. I think that you are correct. It should give you a longer slice. I too like flex in the blade.

      Rob

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      • #4
        Paul~ thanks for taking a look. I hadn't really planned on sharpening the back, but dang, now you got me a looking
        Rob~Thanks, it really has the flex, it will take some getting used to, but I think it will help clean up a carving, time will tell
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          I resemble that remark! Pretty cool!!!

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          • #6
            Joe,

            I am curious. How did you shape the blade? Especially the edge. Curved edges that come to a point seem difficult to me. Especially at the tip. Yours seem to be perfect and I bet sharp.

            I may try your shape on a bow saw blade.

            Rob

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            • #7
              Hi Joe, now you are a Knife Maker , you are a Jack of all Trades. Gopd Job. Merle

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              • #8
                Rb~first thank You,
                Second: I used Dremel's EZ404-01 EZ Lock cutoff wheel & Dremel's 8175 Aluminum Oxide Grinding Stone, to shape the blades.
                To get the edge on the blade I used a Ken Onion's Work Sharp w/the blade grinding attachment. It has five different grit belts & the speed can be varied/

                I used it a little yesterda=Itdoese have a lots of flex (will have to get use to that), & I thinking I going to take it to my TomZ to reduce the included angle a bit more, I think something like a 12° included angle will work better with the flex

                Slow working I believe is the best to achieve the shape & sharpness desired

                ###############

                You what they Merle, jack of all trades, master of none. I do enjoy taking small breaks from carving, keeps the interest sharp





                . . .JoeB

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                • #9
                  I think it's a natural progression in carving. You get so far when you think: " I need an edge of such-and-such a shape."
                  Probably already know that you can't buy it. So you make one as the only sensible thing to do.
                  You already have the skills to sharpen just about anything, right? The next blades are easier as your confidence climbs.

                  How is this one? Push cuts or pull cuts or both?
                  Brian T

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
                    I think it's a natural progression in carving. You get so far when you think: " I need an edge of such-and-such a shape."
                    Probably already know that you can't buy it. So you make one as the only sensible thing to do.
                    You already have the skills to sharpen just about anything, right? The next blades are easier as your confidence climbs.

                    How is this one? Push cuts or pull cuts or both?
                    it works both ways, I'm still thinking about sharpening the inside (concave), but I have a Warren concave blade.
                    . . .JoeB

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                    • #11
                      Make another one, single edged, so you have a right and left handed pair.
                      Time and again, I catch myself carving with one in each hand.
                      Brian T

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
                        I think it's a natural progression in carving. You get so far when you think: " I need an edge of such-and-such a shape."
                        Probably already know that you can't buy it. So you make one as the only sensible thing to do.
                        You already have the skills to sharpen just about anything, right? The next blades are easier as your confidence climbs.
                        Brian,

                        Oh, how true. I have found that I have to make one that fits my needs. Both blade and handle.

                        Rob

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                        • #13
                          Brian, no need for a left-handed knife, I'm like a cub bear and a beach ball with my left hand, no matter how much I practice
                          . . .JoeB

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                          • #14
                            I'm very comfortably ambidextrous. Pac NW style crooked knives are usually double-edge, which I don't like.
                            I want to turn it over, switch hands and be able to push with my thumb.
                            Western Red Cedar is sometimes so brittle that to cut a Vee groove circle, it's 8 cuts of a quarter circle each.
                            So the crooked knives that I build from L/R pairs of farrier's knives suit me just fine.

                            Guess it all depends on caring style and what you need the edge to do.
                            I want to carve a dish with flat sides and a flat bottom.

                            Do you recall some Russian, a couple of years back, who was making wicked slicing knives from scrap steel?
                            Fantastic, but edges I don't need at all (so far).
                            Brian T

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                            • #15
                              Sorry RV, I don't recall the post you are referring to.

                              I finish off carving Ozark Slim today. So I broke out the TomZ. want to change the included angle to see if it would cut better~~~it did.

                              For any of you who might be interested in how I got the 12° included angle:
                              1. Measure the blade with a Mice. in this case, it was 0.017." thick.
                              2. Divide the thickness by two 0.017/2=0.0085"
                              3. Multiply by 9.51 (the inverse of the Tan 6°) 9.51x0.0085=0.0808"
                              4. Multiply 0.0808x 64ths= 5/64' or about 1/16"

                              This is the distance the bevel has to come up the side of the blade to give 6° bevel on one side.

                              Clear as mud give a shout out and I'll see if I can do better






                              . . .JoeB

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