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  • Great V tool

    This is perhaps one of the nicest cutting v-tools I have ever used. It's my master's. It's a fishtail v-tool. Shown by a mirror frame I'm working on.
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  • #2
    Nice. What do you find so outstanding about it? The angle? The edge? The narow fish tail part?
    Can you work with hand pressure alone or do you need a small mallet?

    My next reaction is/was: "what have I got that I can grind up and make one?"
    Maybe sacrifice one of my soapstone carving V gouges.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      It cuts very well. Especially on curves. It think the fishtail shape means it essentially gets out of its own way on curves. Here is a photo of another gouge that shows grinding the edge away from the sides of the bevel side. If you are getting into a tight space you can see where not having that steel there is a plus. The gouge will not bind as easily and I think it's the same principle going on with the v-tool.

      Forgot to address your question about the mallet, here goes. I work with hand pressure usually. Unless, and this will seem contrary to many here, I will use a mallet on a critical cut.

      It's actually far easier to control with a very light tap tap tap. You can do all the back pressure you want, one hand resisting the other, but eventually you will get it wrong and the tool goes further than you want. That is a lot less likely to happen with a mallet.

      People think of mallet tools and think that they are usually used with a mallet (I rarely do) and when they are used with a mallet, it's a 2 lb'er swung with wild abandon. Maybe roughing out a big sculpture, but for decorative carving a light tap tap tap. I use a small brass mallet or sometimes a cabinet makers mallet, the square headed kind.
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      Last edited by fiddlesticks; 12-07-2018, 07:32 PM.

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      • #4
        Thank you for your observations, they are exactly like mine for mallet carving. Exactly.
        There's far more control with the tapping of a light mallet on smaller gouges.
        I understand the idea of a "critical cut".
        You choke up on the mallet handle for the sweet taps that cut to just where you need to go.

        Must ransack the tool rolls and look for something that I can grind up for an edge like yours.

        My elbow adzes fill the bill these days for the rough work.
        The D-adze is easy to control (weighs 14+ oz the way I built it).

        I might build a 1" wide or a 1/2" wide D adze this winter.
        I guess a fairly good chisel would be an OK steel to use.
        Have a 1/2" Narex skew with no known use so far.

        Bought a 6 speed grinder (half price sale) for shaping and polishing. 2,000 - 3750 rpm.
        Santa knows how to shop for Grandpa.
        Hmmmmmmm. . ... now you got me going.
        Thanks
        Brian T

        Comment


        • #5
          100 percent correct on the choking up. Here are photos of two mallets I use and the general way I hold them. Also another shot of a gouge. I can't take any credit for how the tool is ground, that is the experience of someone that is 82 and apprenticed as a carver at age 12. I believe if you read Wheeler and Haywood's "Woodcarving the Beginners Guide", they show the same in Figure 6 and Figure 13 in the sharpening section, but my teacher would no doubt tell you they got it from the Greek's
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          Last edited by fiddlesticks; 12-07-2018, 09:29 PM.

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          • #6
            Nice and clear pictures.
            I have just the 2 mallets, the 12oz and the 30oz. Both have tapered polyurethane faces.
            When I use gouges, I find I pick up the 30 most of the time and choke up for small strikes.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              I totally agree with the light tapping of a mallet to give you great control. I will use a light tap on palm gouges and even my Dockyard tools when I need to exactly control the depth of the cut.

              Claude
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              • #8
                I thinking you made that and its not purchased if so thats beyond me to make and you mentioned a 6 speed grinder I didn't know that existed you wouldn't want to share the name and where you got it I use a little impact driver on slow but its not consistent and isn't consistent to a fine touch hopefully its not too expensive as my wife is tired of someone buying tools I always have to sneak down to the mailbox before she does

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                • #9
                  Brian, how did you make out with your experiments?

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                  • #10
                    WOW! That's really beautiful! It is very painstaking work, I could not do that

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                    • #11
                      What was I supposed to have done for experiments? Mid 2019 and my health was deteriorating very quickly. As I recall, I had abandoned carving as I could not cope with the stairs down to the basement shop. I could not standup even long enough to make a piece of toast.

                      Several hours under the knife and some large after-market parts and I feel like a rat-rod.
                      But, each week I'm spending more and more time at the bench making shavings.

                      I'll find the poop on the grinder tomorrow. Midnight and I need sack time.
                      Brian T

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                        What was I supposed to have done for experiments? Mid 2019 and my health was deteriorating very quickly. As I recall, I had abandoned carving as I could not cope with the stairs down to the basement shop. I could not standup even long enough to make a piece of toast.

                        Several hours under the knife and some large after-market parts and I feel like a rat-rod.
                        But, each week I'm spending more and more time at the bench making shavings.

                        I'll find the poop on the grinder tomorrow. Midnight and I need sack time.
                        HI Brian, hope your health has improved. The experiment I was referring to was your post #4 above


                        Must ransack the tool rolls and look for something that I can grind up for an edge like yours.

                        My elbow adzes fill the bill these days for the rough work.
                        The D-adze is easy to control (weighs 14+ oz the way I built it).

                        I might build a 1" wide or a 1/2" wide D adze this winter.
                        I guess a fairly good chisel would be an OK steel to use.
                        Have a 1/2" Narex skew with no known use so far.

                        Bought a 6 speed grinder (half price sale) for shaping and polishing. 2,000 - 3750 rpm.
                        Santa knows how to shop for Grandpa.
                        Hmmmmmmm. . ... now you got me going.
                        Thanks"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thank you for the reminder. I have10 unfinished carvings on the bench. I'd like to knock off a few of those before I get into anything new. Each week, I notice that I can sit in the shop for longer and longer and still cope with the stairs up to my regular kitchen. I was gifted some blades and got those hafted, bought a few finished crooked knives and still have one big adze blade to haft in birch.

                          I have a 12/8 vee that gets used once a year under the best of circumstances. I'm accustomed to dragging a straight knife on the line and cutting back to that with a pair of 1/2" skews, revised from 25 to 20 degrees. The Vee always gets jammed in the grain, going around a curve.
                          Brian T

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That's really beautiful! It is very painstaking work, I could not do that. Indeed, I specialize in car repair and I usually work with some other tools. But I know how difficult is to make a straight line or a seam evenly. Indeed a lot depends on the equipment that you use. I ordered a new plasma cutter auditpowertools.com and now my many things became much easier for me to do. But sure, if you have no experience and professionalism, no tool can make you vomit no matter how good it is.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fiddlesticks View Post
                              It cuts very well. Especially on curves. It think the fishtail shape means it essentially gets out of its own way on curves. Here is a photo of another gouge that shows grinding the edge away from the sides of the bevel side. If you are getting into a tight space you can see where not having that steel there is a plus. The gouge will not bind as easily and I think it's the same principle going on with the v-tool.

                              Forgot to address your question about the mallet, here goes. I work with hand pressure usually. Unless, and this will seem contrary to many here, I will use a mallet on a critical cut.

                              It's actually far easier to control with a very light tap tap tap. You can do all the back pressure you want, one hand resisting the other, but eventually you will get it wrong and the tool goes further than you want. That is a lot less likely to happen with a mallet.

                              People think of mallet tools and think that they are usually used with a mallet (I rarely do) and when they are used with a mallet, it's a 2 lb'er swung with wild abandon. Maybe roughing out a big sculpture, but for decorative carving a light tap tap tap. I use a small brass mallet or sometimes a cabinet makers mallet, the square headed kind.
                              Interesting observation on the fishtail part. I have not seen gouges like that, very interesting. makes me consider making one.

                              Also, the mallet being more precise makes perfect sense to me. I once had a job where I had to do precision cuts with a table saw. So I had to move the fence tiny amounts based on how the previous cut went.

                              For the life of me, moving it by hand was very inaccurate, our spongy muscles would overshoot the amount of energy/movement required. Tapping it with my palm was inaccurate due to the softness of my palm, a small tap did nothing while a larger tap would make it jump too far.

                              But a a tiny mallet? I had no trouble making it reach a very consistent speed and then just letting physics carry it into the fence. Every tap moved it just the tiniest amount without fail because all its energy would transfer. And given how much a mallet is used in machining to align things to 0.001" or better, it should really be no wonder that a mallet can be an extremely accurate method of delivering a precise amount of movement by limiting the total energy involved.
                              https://www.Jamie-Sharp.com/ Straight and curved wood carving knives

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