Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Storage problems. Rust on a whole diferent level.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

    Naval Jelly will indeed remove rust, but it won't help the real problem here, i.e., pitting.

    I would de-rust, sharpen and test carve with each one that's not totally shot. To my mind, that's the only way to see what can be salvaged...as the old saying goes, "The proof of the pudding is in the eating."
    I'm hopefull that i'll manage to salvage a few of them. My biggest problem is the time that will take to get them ready. I lost my job some months back and was trying to get into woodcarving again as an income source (already have some orders from a few places back in scotland) and with no money to buy new tools i'll just have to crack on with fixing them i supose.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Randy View Post
      Those are bad. I do not know if this will work well for those but may be worth trying I have done this on some rusted tools and it worked well but they were not that bad. Hope it will work for you . It will not help with the pitting but will stop the rust. and clean the tools.
      https://www.finewoodworking.com/2014...s-rust-remover
      Oh i'm giving a go at anything that might help.

      Comment


      • #18
        I've got no help for your tools but I spent some time on Terceira with the Navy and at least you live on beautiful island withg wonderful people.

        Comment


        • #19
          Like everyone else, those photos were painful to see. The rust is easy to remove but the only way to fix the pitting is to grind them down and resharpen if the pits are not too deep. Wish you the best of luck. For removing rust, most of the time I use a rust eraser, which is also good for cleaning ceramic sharpening rods and stones.
          https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/L...iABEgISWPD_BwE
          Terry

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by jjmg View Post
            I've got no help for your tools but I spent some time on Terceira with the Navy and at least you live on beautiful island withg wonderful people.
            Very nice. I'm afraid that the numbers of US forces here dropped drastically. I used to love going shopping @ the BX store now it's all gone. How long were you stationed here for?

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Nomad View Post
              Like everyone else, those photos were painful to see. The rust is easy to remove but the only way to fix the pitting is to grind them down and resharpen if the pits are not too deep. Wish you the best of luck. For removing rust, most of the time I use a rust eraser, which is also good for cleaning ceramic sharpening rods and stones.
              https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/L...iABEgISWPD_BwE
              Indeed the problem is the pitting. I'm hoping that by tomorrow i should have all rust removed and start on the dificult task of trying to restore them. The fact that i'm having to do it all manually is not helping the speed of doing it.

              Comment


              • #22
                He should be friend enuff to ask the insurance company anyway. If not maybe you can find a used set or restore those.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by hobo View Post
                  He should be friend enuff to ask the insurance company anyway. If not maybe you can find a used set or restore those.
                  I can look through my stash of chisels to see what I have for extras. I’ve got lots of chisels that I’ve not used in months. It’s one of those thing where I’ll know I’ll need it as soon as I get rid of something. I will of course need a place to stay during the winter. My friends have been going there to ride bikes during the winter.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    i may be way off here but isnt there some kind of electric treatment through some kind of liquid solution, that is used to clean up various metal things? cant for the life of me remember the name of it. sonic or something.
                    Denny

                    photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Get a grinder with a wire wheel and see what they look like after the rust comes off. They may be too pitted to get a decent edge.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Little update: Got around 30 of them "restored". They're all FUGLY as hell but sharp as my mother-in-law's tongue... 53816997_419953825416405_3557485234767265792_n.jpg

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by drhandrich View Post
                          i may be way off here but isnt there some kind of electric treatment through some kind of liquid solution, that is used to clean up various metal things? cant for the life of me remember the name of it. sonic or something.
                          Yes. Electrolysis.. Not sure how it spells

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I think your spelling is good and, yes, the tool is ugly as sin, but if they clean up decently and sharpen well, then I think you've made a great save.

                            Tinwood

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by rraposo View Post
                              Little update: Got around 30 of them "restored". They're all FUGLY as hell but sharp as my mother-in-law's tongue... 53816997_419953825416405_3557485234767265792_n.jpg
                              I don’t see the inside bevel but after you do a little sharping and your inside of the bevel is chunky, you can add an inside bevel which takes care of it. Chris Pie suggests an inside bevel like he uses. I just picked up some great crooked knifes from an older gentleman. While I was looking at some of his wood working I saw a roll of tools. I ask if I could look at them and he forgot he had bought 15-20 pfeil chisels in the 80s that he never used. The looked brand new as if they were in the store. If I didn’t just buy a bunch of stuff from him I would made an offer for them, there was a few I didn’t have but most I would have gifted or sold. Lots of good stuff popping up on eBay.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Vice View Post

                                I don’t see the inside bevel but after you do a little sharping and your inside of the bevel is chunky, you can add an inside bevel which takes care of it. Chris Pie suggests an inside bevel like he uses. I just picked up some great crooked knifes from an older gentleman. While I was looking at some of his wood working I saw a roll of tools. I ask if I could look at them and he forgot he had bought 15-20 pfeil chisels in the 80s that he never used. The looked brand new as if they were in the store. If I didn’t just buy a bunch of stuff from him I would made an offer for them, there was a few I didn’t have but most I would have gifted or sold. Lots of good stuff popping up on eBay.
                                So far i've been quite lucky in the sense that i haven't had many problems on the inner bevels. "knock on wood".

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X