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  • Draw knive

    I have a very old Draw knive, 2 handles, blade about 10 inches wide. Just messing around with a dried log.
    What is the proper orientation of the blade when you pull towards you , Bevel up?

  • #2
    Right you are = bevel up. Whatever pulls the easiest shavings. I do mine (Stubai) up at 25 degrees.
    The wood to be peeled off should come off the bevel face as a wedging action. Same as making shakes with a froe.
    I use mine as a rough-out tool to round off square posts for round poles for carvings.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      Many thanks again, this thing is quite old was the wifes grandfathers, looks like a low end tool.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ptofimpact View Post
        Many thanks again, this thing is quite old was the wifes grandfathers, looks like a low end tool.
        If it’s old it’s likely got good steel, even homeowner handyman stuff had good steal. It may not as ergonomic or the best bevel angle as soon of the nicer brands but likely it will need to be shRpened. Do you know what type of tree your cleaning up? If it’s dirty it would be good to remove the bark with an axe. Most logging that’s done around here unless it’s in the dry parts of the winter is covered in dry mud, before my dad starts slicing trees up on his mill he tries to debarked them. Spring is a great time to peal off most bark from trees, if it’s an old log you could try Saturating the barn. My dad has a bent chisels that he rounded the corners so that he can get under the bark in pry off. Have fun!!!

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        • #5
          Hi RV , I always wondered about the Bevel on a Draw Knife , up or down . I find it easier to use with the Bevel down , in fact Bevel up don't work for me. It keeps digging in . Does that mean that my Angle is wrong ? Merle

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          • #6
            I have no answer, Merle. Like sharpening = half a dozen ways to get there.

            Magard Tools in Prince George, BC makes BIG draw knives for the log-home building industry, 4 dozen at a time.
            I did a little sharpening for the guy. Do not remember bevel up or down for peeling logs.

            I've always used a draw knife bevel up. Maybe it's what you get used to?
            Of course, at the end of the day, who can tell that you and I did things differently?
            I'm either trying to peel off sap wood or rounding corners on split posts = not a finesse finishing tool for me.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              Well, I guess try it and see what preference you like...I use bevel down with regular wood chisels, just like a plane blade.
              Bill
              Living among knives and fire.

              http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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              • #8
                This may sound kind of crazy. but would the draw knife pull easier if the top of the log/tree was facing you with the butt end down, It would seem to me that way you would be cutting with the growth rings ???????????
                . . .JoeB

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                • #9
                  I expect it would, JP.
                  You carve and split from the top down for exactly the opposite reason = you don't want run-outs.
                  I think it gets really obvious in the big conifers like the cedars.
                  Even starting with something as simple as a fence post, I have to learn which way was 'UP'.

                  I have some friends in the log home building business. I've emailed them for advice.
                  Hope they find a minute to reply.
                  Brian T

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                  • #10
                    Bevel up or down will vary depending on what you are trying to do, grains of the wood, etc. Don't be bashful about flipping it over and trying the other side.

                    JP, the growth rings are more or less consistent the length of the tree on the outer layers, far less runout than sawn wood. That's what makes sawn walking sticks different from harvested saplings, or modern wood arrows different from arrows made from shoots. Once you get into the center of the tree, the grain changes. Back in the day, Robin Hood could split an arrow from knock to tip, mass manufactured arrows the grain runs out and so does the split.

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                    • #11
                      Hi folks,

                      I just wanted to weigh in on the whole drawknife thread. There are several different styles and some of the modern knives are only fit for peeling logs. Others, especially some of the older ones, are designed with "dropped: handles that prevent flipping them. I prefer the style where the handles are in line with the blade so that they can be used in a bevel-up or bevel-down configuration. The deciding factor (for me) is whether I am doing any "scooping" cuts where you can rock on the bevel. They should be razor sharp and skewing the knife can make for an easier and cleaner cut. A slight rounding of the "flat" or "back" side allows for some scooping even with the bevel up with little if any loss of control. If you have a good feel for how the grain is running you can lever the knife for a controlled split. One of the great things about drawknives is that you can really hog off a lot of material quickly or you can do fine delicate cuts. Any craft that starts with a limb, a round, or a block will benefit from having a drawknife or two in the tool kit. Whatever you do, don't beat on the backs when spitting. They made froes and wedges for that. Have fun..

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for all the info, the log is a type of white Birch, stripped all the bark, its very thin.
                        Here is a pic of the old drawknive

                        874B26BF-BFDE-4546-8703-FE3F237F1B9A.jpeg

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                        • #13
                          Looks wonderful. Can you find a length of junk hose to split for an edge guard?
                          I'd be quite happy to use that, lots of life left.
                          Brian T

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                          • #14
                            I have scrap hose for sure, thanks for the idea. Does it look decent? Working on sharpening.

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, it looks good. My draw knife was a surprise gift.
                              Great for skinning sap wood off red cedar log and rounding off post corners for poles.
                              I measured mine (Stubai) at 25 degrees total included bevel so I stick with that.

                              I know that drawknives are as modern as yesterday. Essential in the log home building industry.
                              Mine is a time machine = When I pick it uo for use, I feel like I have fallen back more than a century.
                              Brian T

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