Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

sharpening test

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sharpening test

    what do folks use as a sharpening test we are all familiar with shaving the hair on your arms and chiping a fingernail but are there other tests? I use a newspaper and try and just use the weight of the knife to slice it but if i really get silly i use a cigarette paper and if it cuts that clean then i know its sharp i inderstand the ultimate test i always how it cuts wood but i wonder if there are other ways folks test their edge that might be meangingful for all of us?

  • #2
    I carve across the end grain of basswood. If it cuts cleanly with a bit of a "whistle," it is sharp enough to do what I need it to do.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't carve fingers if I can help it.

      I have a very good piece of each of the woods that I like to carve.
      As I go through my sharpening process, I test the tool edge in this example wood that I am carving at the time.

      Of course, some tools like spoke shaves need to be reassembled for testing. I do them more on faith!!!!
      Brian T

      Comment


      • #4
        I strop the knives and test them on the wood I'm carving. After a while, you get the "feeling" if the knife is cutting fine. Not a scientific process but works for me.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I have an ridiculous number of edged tools and have developed (like most others) my own system for sharpening the different types of tools. For carving tools, after achieving a super slight burr at the edge (if necessary) and honing/stropping the edge, there is no better or safer test than to use it on a piece of stock, particularly softwood end grain. The tool should cut with no tear out and leave a burnished surface. Just remember that the shape of the tool is as important to tool performance as the keenness and polish of the edges. I never shave with my carving tools but I am guilty of occasionally testing out a plane blade (or similar tools) on my arm just for the immediate satisfaction of seeing evidence of a tool well sharpened. It's probably not a smart thing to do but I do enjoy watching all of those little hairs running and screaming in sheer panic from impending doom. Have fun.

          Comment


          • #6
            These are right-on as far as I'm concerned, basic the way that I do, Let's face it we are cutting the wood no getting pretty for the dance
            . . .JoeB

            Comment


            • #7
              No reflection under a bulb, your good to go.

              Comment


              • #8
                Seems like you can tell how sharp an edge is by how "sticky" it is. But just for good measure, like everyone else, a test cut across the grain seems best with gouges and v-tools, with a surface left behind that is ready for finish. Slicing up the yellow pages is a fun test for knives though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another vote for testing on a piece of wood. The cut should leave a smooth shiny surface.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another vote from me on the end grain carving test...should be shiny and smooth with no white streaks...all of my hunting knives will shave the hair off my arm, just like my carving knives, but will not carve wood worth a darn...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rickm View Post
                      what do folks use as a sharpening test we are all familiar with shaving the hair on your arms and chiping a fingernail but are there other tests? I use a newspaper and try and just use the weight of the knife to slice it but if i really get silly i use a cigarette paper and if it cuts that clean then i know its sharp i inderstand the ultimate test i always how it cuts wood but i wonder if there are other ways folks test their edge that might be meangingful for all of us?
                      If you follow the Helvie Knives Facebook page you'll find that Rich Smithson uses the same method to test sharpness as mentioned by Bob Duncan above. In fact, Helvie recently held a contest on their Facebook page where carvers were offered the chance to guess as to how long it took Rich to use up a chunk of wood testing the sharpness of his knives.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use two methods: no light reflecting from the edge when under a point source of light, and cutting end grain on basswood.

                        Claude
                        My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                        My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                        My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Same as Bob. That's the best test for a carving edge, imo. It tests to see if the edge holds up and any scratches will identify nicks, especially ones that appear because the edge doesn't hold up to the test.
                          Terry

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            the light thing doesnt seemto work for me i will try that and then a magnifying glass and still noyt get it right

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I like to use a piece of wood that has two inconsistent wood density’s. Maybe the out side of each growth ring is a bit harder than the rest of the ring. I like it better than just a soft wood that will tear cutting cross with a dull gouge, when the U shape gouge hits the hard bit, if it’s not sharp enough it crush the soft wood behind it before it slices through it. Then I know it’s sharpe enough to start shaving my legs lol

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X