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  • tormek update

    I bought a tormek t-4 looked at the wen and jet and grizzly and rikon and read reviews until my vision blurred.Anyway as soon as i get it and am able to figure stout Ill give you all progress report looking forward to not spending countless hours sharpening and prematurely wearing out knives just couldn't stand it anymore

  • #2
    I'd like to watch what you do. I've never worn out an edge from sharpening.
    I would be annoyed, too, if sharpening took me anywhere near that long.
    Freehand, if there's very little damage, maybe 5 minutes.

    I never need more than maybe 6(?) strokes on the strop
    to hone a great edge for really soft wood such as western red cedar.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      brian your one of those magic guys and if you saw me sharpen you'd probably wince so all combined i need a better way and im hoping the tormek will do it, its either that or don't know, give up> I can put a edge on a gouge in 3 minutes but knives forget it it seems and i do turn out some pretty good edges but the frustration and time involved seems to much to me

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      • #4
        I'm with you Rickm - pretty good results when sharpening gouges, but so-so on knives. I'm pretty satisfied with my carving knives, but disappointed with the pocket knives I use for miscellaneous tasks in the house or garden. First, I've noticed that the bevel put on many pocket knives is rather blunt. If I sharpen it the way I do a carving knife, with a bevel of 10 or 12 degrees, it doesn't hold up. After a day or two I can run my finger along the cutting edge with no danger of a cut. I'm thinking I should go back to a bevel like it had when purchased - to give up some sharpness for durability.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rickm View Post
          I bought a tormek t-4 looked at the wen and jet and grizzly and rikon and read reviews until my vision blurred.Anyway as soon as i get it and am able to figure stout Ill give you all progress report looking forward to not spending countless hours sharpening and prematurely wearing out knives just couldn't stand it anymore
          Rick posted this on old thread but just in case Henschel alert check eBay listed as KGH knife
          Ed
          Living in a pile of chips.
          https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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          • #6
            I rest my crooked knives on my right knee. Usually beginning with 800 wrapped around something,
            I'll guess that I'm sharpening for about 15 degrees or so, maybe a little less, total included bevel.

            In the kitchen, Porsche* recommended a total included bevel of 20 degrees, finished on a 4K waterstone.
            My Chestnut carbide sharpeners are about 20 degrees so I go with that for all the knives.
            * he's the brother of the car guy

            I've ordered a 320/1200 diamond plate to play with some badly chipped ceramic kitchen knives.
            I have not yet measured the bevel angles on those. Very brittle material.

            ure and body movement (freeze!) at the end of each stroke seems key to holding edges.
            Power sharpening must be an entirely different set of things to learn.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              i think thats my problem is a lack consistency in the bevels whether the tormek will remedy that remains to be seen i think if i follow the directions etc and use due caution i will be happy. my problem is i don't follow directions very good. this might force me to as its not bright to spend all that money and then end up with bad results, and if i canst get it done on a tormek its probably not doable. the first thing i will be tempted to do is throw the guides in a drawer and do it freehand which i have seen vides of people doing but it would be wiser to follow the sequence they describe. anyway wish me luck

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              • #8
                A lot of the freehand sharpening process has little to do with applying the tool edge to the abrasive.
                You could watch me and never figure it out. I'll bet the YouTubes are the same.
                It looks simple but really some points to learn.

                You make your body the jig.
                Stand up. Clamp the abrasive parallel to the edge of the bench.
                Lock your forearms to your ribs so you can't sweep up at the ends of the knife strokes.
                Hold the tool at the needed angle in your fingertips, not much pressure needed.
                Sharpen from your knees, never from your elbows.

                Of course, this works if you can stand up and move your body from your knees.
                I understand the challenge for those who can't. I've been repaired so I can do it again.

                Eventually, I learned how to hold the knife and move the abrasive.
                Most First Nations carvers in the Pacific Northwest will do this.
                That's really deceptive to watch. I've screwed that up more times than I can remember.
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  bruins i think i getehat your talking about and have had similar thoughts so tanx for posting obviously the finer points of sharpening are lost on me

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