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Inner bevel on gouges?

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  • Inner bevel on gouges?

    Do you put a bevel on the inside of your gouges or just beveled on the outside? I'm talking mainly about palm tools, not mallet tools, but would be interested in hearing about those too.

  • #2
    Just the outside. I’ve only seen one gouge with a double bevel it was a really old cast steel piece. Although most carving chisels and skews are double beveled.
    Ed
    Living in a pile of chips.
    https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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    • #3
      Maybe I should clarify what I mean. I'm talking about just a slight 5 degree or so bevel. I was reading an old article by Chris Pye, and he talked about doing it. I haven't been, and wondered if I should be.

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      • #4
        I agree with only the outside bevel, but you might try it on one of your gouges, and see if you like it.. Most tools come with only the outside. There may be a reason for that. If not real careful, you could also change the profile of your gouge.
        If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

        www.spokanecarvers.com

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        • #5
          Outside bevels on gouges.
          If an inside bevel was really a good thing, the big names would be selling tools made that way.
          They don't.
          Pye's preference is a personal preference.
          Remember that the bevel is the angle that you are going to push the wood open as a chip off the block.
          Adding maybe 5* just makes for a bigger angle with a harder push.
          = = =
          Oddly enough, all the FN carving tools of the Pacific Northwest (adzes and crooked knives)
          have inside bevels. Not the easiest to sharpen and hone.
          Brian T

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          • #6
            I don't add an inner bevel, have never tried. Why? Because I'm lazy and it's less work to shape and hone a single bevel. I'd love to hear from people who do add an inner bevel what advantage does it add to outweigh the extra maintenance?

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            • #7
              I wouldn't go out of my way to add a incannel bevel, but I do strop both the inside and outside of my tools. I find the gouge does carve easier through the wood if I do. So, before adding the 5 degree bevel, I would try stropping it maybe 5 times and see if it makes a difference--that is if you haven't already done this.

              Bob L

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              • #8
                I have a 1 1/4 " Gouge with the Bevel on the inside and wouldn't change it . It was made that way and realy removes Wood with a Mallet when roughing out . It is made by Buck Brothers and Cast Steel . Seems to hold an Edge well . Used it to make my Propellers for my Model Airplanes when I was a Kid, the Pitch on the Propeller is the same as the Gouge . I was thinking of changing it awhile back , glad I didn't . Wouldn't change my other Tools to the inside , they both work well they way they were made . Merle

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                • #9
                  I sometimes use a slipstone on the inner side of gouges, but not to create a bevel. Like Brian T, I strop the inner surface. It is also interesting to consider the firming gouges used by carpenters (long ago) that were beveled only on the inside. The dog leg chisels made by Pfeil are beveled on the upper side.

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                  • #10
                    I always stone and strop/buff the inner surface of gouges to remove any grinding marks near the edge. While not normally intended to create a specific internal bevel, this invariably does create a very low-angled small bevel on the interior of the gouge. While it may slightly change the profile, it is my opinion that the change is so small as to be undetectable when carving. It is my understanding that purposefully introducing an internal bevel allows you to create a longer bevel on the exterior effectively allowing you to lower the "angle-of-attack" of the tool while maintaining a desirable, included angle to the edge, The other advantage to an internal bevel is that it is supposed to facilitate using the tool "upside down" when doing more consistent convex surfaces (think of vines or limbs). I would be curious to see how many carvers are out there that use their gouges upside down.

                    The one place where I have intentionally used internal beveling on carving gouges is when restoring older gouges where internal surface pitting is present. This moves the edge further into the body of the tool eliminating the pitting at the edge. In-cannel (interior bevel) gouges are used by cabinetmakers and pattern makers when creating cuts that match the exterior curvature of the tools they use. The tool makes the radius and gives greater precision to the cut instead of relying on the skill of the craftsman. Have fun.

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                    • #11
                      I just flat strop the inside to remove any wire edges formed when sharping the outer bevel
                      . . .JoeB

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                      • #12
                        Big spoon gouges, elbow adzes, D adzes and draw knives all have the bevels on the upper/inner/in cannel face.
                        They perform in western red cedar just the same as any of my collection
                        of Pfeil gouges with all the bevels on the down/outside. Only my stop chisels ( 1/8 and 1/12) have double bevels.
                        Brian T

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                          I just flat strop the inside to remove any wire edges formed when sharping the outer bevel
                          I agree with Joe's concise comment. However, I do have a tiny skew that's double beveled from the manufacturer.
                          Arthur

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                          • #14
                            Novice here however it seems a double edge would spread the cut while a single would spread on that side only. Depends on need and use to me. I have single edge ones myself. The stones I got for my wood lathe years ago are 'arch' stones. Concave on one side and convex on the other. One to cut the edge and sharpen. The other to clean the bur off. The stones are (guess) 8" long in three grits. I have 'finger nail' gouges and blunt bowl gouges. Different world in turning.

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                            • #15
                              I primarily us palm tools now. I strop the inside of my tools. The flex cut stropping block works well on most. For deeper U gouges I have made strops gluing leather around some different size dowels. Cleans off any burs that may form on the cutting edge an smooth the inside helping the blade slip though the wood with less pressure. I find it worth the time.
                              Last edited by Randy; 12-12-2019, 09:47 AM.

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