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hans karrlson ????

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  • hans karrlson ????

    I wondering if they went out of business no one has their stock and there isn't anything on the website im looking for a bent gouge about medium size if anyone wants to sell one thanks

  • #2
    Pfeil (Swiss Made) makes 20 profiles of long bent gouges from 5 to 35 mm wide. They also make 30 profiles of spoon bent gouges from 3 to 30 mm. Woodcraft has an exclusive dealership license for Pfeil tools in the U.S.

    Hans Karlsson (note spelling) is still in business, but doesn't offer bent gouges.
    Last edited by pallin; 12-16-2019, 04:25 PM.

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    • #3
      i know but i wanted the karrlson

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      • #4
        https://woodsmithexperience.co.uk/sh...arlsson-tools/
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          I bought mine through Country Workshops but they closed in 2017. I don't know about any bent gouges but their dog leg gouges are excellent for bowl carving. I don't know anyone at the moment that imports them but I haven't searched lately.
          bowl_carving_tools1b.jpg
          You do not have permission to view this gallery.
          This gallery has 1 photos.
          Terry

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          • #6
            Oops! I guess my Karlsson gouges are bent. Bent gouges are shown in Joe's link. hans_karlsson1c.jpg
            Terry

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            • #7
              I looked at the Karlsson tools. Hardened to just 55. Isn't that a little bit soft?
              I can't afford the factory prices. The shipping would wipe me out.

              What with the currency exchange rate, even the American blades
              are right at the limit of my Canadian budget.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                I can say from personal experience of carving kiln-dried (not green) hardwoods like walnut, butternut, cherry, box elder, and maple, that they hold an edge as well or better than my other large gouges which are Pfeil, Two Cherries and Flexcut.
                Terry

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                • #9
                  55-66 is reported to be the useful range of Rockwell hardness.
                  Above that and steels become brittle and chip like ceramic knife edges do.
                  Softer might be more forgiving.

                  I've just been learning that those very hard and brittle edges can be recovered with a diamond plate.
                  Brian T

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                  • #10
                    I have no problem with reprofiling knife edges up to about 58-59 just using sandpaper. But once you get into the 60s, diamond plates or power driven belts/discs are almost mandatory. 55-56 is a good rockwell for cutting tools that take impact. Good axes, for instance are rarely hardened above 56 but it also depends on the type of steel. Rockwell is not the be all and end all definition of a good steel. The ratio of carbon to alloys can make a big difference as well. 5160, for instance, is very popular for high quality axes because it has a low carbon to alloy ratio and therefore is very impact resistant.

                    http://axeing.org/guide-to-the-most-...ed-axe-steels/
                    Terry

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the link, Nomad. It helps our understanding of various tool steels.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pallin View Post
                        Thanks for the link, Nomad. It helps our understanding of various tool steels.
                        There's some good info there but one of the more knowledgeable statements made is this (imo).

                        "Certain desired properties in knives are considered undesirable or unnecessary in axes." Simply put, application can make a big difference in the type of steel and desired heat treat. There is also a big difference between adequate and ideal. I can recall when anything above 55-56 for knives was frowned on. Then the pendulum swung towards harder blades with the so called "uber" steels and sophisticated heat treats and cryo treatments. In the end, it all comes down to personal preference. I've tested 154 CM stainless steel for carving (using a Tony Bose/Case semi custom knife) and was amazed at how long I could carve without stropping. But on the other hand, I have no problem with stropping and am more than happy with a good high carbon low alloy steel as long as the heat treat is good. It's fun to play with steels but I think most carvers just want something that works and could care less about knife steel (like us crazy knife knuts).
                        Terry

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                        • #13
                          Thanks, Terry, printed it off and got it filed, with my knife making stuff
                          . . .JoeB

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rickm View Post
                            I wondering if they went out of business no one has their stock and there isn't anything on the website im looking for a bent gouge about medium size if anyone wants to sell one thanks
                            they are still in business but can afford it to make every time a limited number of gouges/adzes/axes/spoonknifes. You better get in the mail list for updates or follow them on instagram to know when stuff is out. Or get in the mail list of woodsmith Experience (UK). Every time they have material to sell everything is sold within the hour!



                            Jos
                            Belgium

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