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  • timber wolf bandsaw blades

    Got one today for delta 9. 59 and 1/2 . 3/16 4 tooth.

    They are as good as folks recommend. Tested on a knife handle blank. Beats hand sawing. Did a great job.

    Highly recommend these folks

    Rob

  • #2
    I've been using them since I got my bandsaw, probably five years now. I broke the first blade Sun. a 93.5" 3/16" 4PC, had a spare in the cabinet, got another order. I've been well pleased with the blades, sometimes not so much with the sawyer at times
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      Those are great blades. It pays to order several at a time, though, because shipping costs are high for small orders.
      Arthur

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      • #4
        You Arthur, This blade has lasted almost as long as I've had the saw, I agree about the shipping cost, but to just $ setting there in extra blades, that I might not get to use
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          Yep, fantastic blades, and have used them without a problem.
          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #6
            I have a little 9" Delta bench top band saw.
            It will not follow a line, no matter which brand new blade is on the saw.
            All the set-up is done with a feeler gauge. OK, did all that.

            Please describe in detail how you set the tension on the band saw blade.
            How do I know when I have the blade tight enough? Forget the various knobs and dials.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              Brian: It depends somewhat on the blade. Some want it quite tight, others not so. Here's what Suffolk Machinery says about the Timberwolf blades: https://www.timberwolfblades.com/blade-tension.php

              Claude
              My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

              My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

              My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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              • #8
                Thanks Claude. That was a good read.
                Nowhere do they ever describe the results cutting wood of high or low blade tension.
                Does the blade wander in the wood or not?

                I have no means to measure blade tension.
                My BS _always_ wanders with new blades of all brands.
                I do all the set-up by the book with a feeler gauge as described.

                I'm just guessing that the last and undefinable parameter, blade tension, is important.
                "Change the tension 5%." Huh?

                Tomorrow, I crank up the blade tension to either cut or explode. Won't be the first one!

                I can feed fast or slow, I don't think that's an issue.
                I wind up feeding the stock at 45 degrees until the blade breaks.

                I need to cut out a few adze handle blanks from clean 2" seasoned birch.
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  Saw an ad for timbe wolfe blades on nashville tn public tv after show on wood worker show on knives.

                  Rob

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                    Thanks Claude. That was a good read.
                    Nowhere do they ever describe the results cutting wood of high or low blade tension.
                    Does the blade wander in the wood or not?

                    I need to cut out a few adze handle blanks from clean 2" seasoned birch.
                    On my 9" Craftsman, I have on a few occasions forgotten to tighten the tension; it cut just fine - no wandering with the Timberwolf blade. I bought a new Jet 14 inch bandsaw a few months back so I could cut some thicker wood. As soon as I got it, I looked in the manual for the blade size and bought a Timberwolf blade for it. The blade that came with it is sitting in a box, unused. I think I remember the Suffolk Machinery folks saying that too much tension will greatly shorten the blade life of the silicon steel blades, and that they don't need as much tension as other steels...

                    My 3/16 inch blade cuts 3.5 inch walnut, 2 inch maple, 1.5 inch purpleheart, etc., without a problem. Birch can't be much harder than those...

                    Claude
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                    My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                    My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                    • #11
                      That's interesting. I set the upper blade guide no more than 1/4" above the wood.
                      Every feed at any speed and every blade wants to cut 45 degrees to the left as you look at the teeth.
                      Never a simple cut to follow any line or ripping guide.

                      Wood species shouldn't matter.
                      I mentioned birch as that's about the only hardwood that I ever use.
                      The rest is all some kinds of cedar.
                      I can't believe that wood hardness has anything at all to do with blade wander.
                      Brian T

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                      • #12
                        Brian, I had the same problem using Bosch blades...couldn't cut a line straight on no matter how I adjusted the saw. Finally got Timberwolf and it cuts straight. Can't explain it. I do still break the blades from time to time, more often than the Bosch blades, through my own fault I'm sure, so I order several at a time to always have a spare and to cut down on the shipping cost per blade.
                        Arthur

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                        • #13
                          When using a blade of 3/16" width or less, the positioning of the guides becomes critical. If the guides are too close to the points of the teeth the guides may destroy the set of the teeth. The tooth set is what determines the kerf width. This could happen within minutes of installing a new blade, without cutting any stock. The guides should not be forward of the tooth gullets. The backing guide (thrust wheel) must not allow the side guides to contact the tooth set.

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                          • #14
                            Yes once the set is ruined, you're out of luck, might as well change blades out. I know the same thing was true at home at the meat processing plant my folks had, You couldn't cut a steak with consistent thickness if you had knocked the set from the teeth, it would start out OK the get thinner as you cut through the loin or round.
                            . . .JoeB

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                            • #15
                              I bought a garage sale Craftsman bandsaw in 2009, and found a blade at Sears. Didn't last very long. Somebody here recommended Timberwolf, and I ordered a half dozen blades. I don't know how many blades I've gone through since then, but Timberwolf keeps getting my money. Those blades just work. I've always been fully satisfied with the product and the company.

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