Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Knife question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Knife question

    I've been watching a few of Lynn O. Doughty's videos and am fascinated by the effectiveness of the utility knife. I'm guessing the thinness coupled with the depth of the blade contributes greatly to it's effectiveness. Is there a flat grind carving knife in the 1 1/2" - 2" blade length that mimics the blade parameters of a utility knife? Murphey knives has a whittler for example that comes close, OCCT also has one that's really just a large detail knife.

  • #2
    The 'Old Reliable' knife Lynn uses is kind of one of a kind...I use mine for roughing out larger pieces. That is after I modified the knife so the blade sticks out a bit farther.

    I would check out Paul's knives at Deepwoods Ventures...he hand forges his knives and they are a pretty flat grind and are scary sharp.

    He even takes special orders and will build a knife to your specs.

    I have one of Mike Shipley's old power hacksaw blade knives with a 1 3/8 blade, and had a 2" blade knife until Dallas Deege at Old Texas Woodcarvers traded me out of it. That was about as thin and as a flat grind on a production knife I have seen. Unfortunately, you can't get those knives made that way anymore, that is unless you happen to find one on Ebay...

    I would say no production knife would carve like a thin utility blade, but I could be wrong...

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the input, I'll look at Deepwoods.

      Comment


      • #4
        The late Leonard Lee (Lee Valley) claimed that you really need to have enough steel behind the edge to support it in service. That explains why we are not all carving wood with Feather #11 scalpels.

        Over and over here in the forums, I have read of the satisfaction that members get from building their own knife. As dull blades, there's all kinds of used steel lying around from big band saws, power hack saws, Sawzalls, etc.

        Make 3 knife blades. Odds are that one of them will be exactly what you want. Cut, shape, grind and sharpen little flakes of junk steel. That's it. Does not take a big shop full of big power tools to get it done. Took me 20 years of carving before I bought a real 6-speed grinder. I can't remember why I thought that I needed it.
        Brian T

        Comment


        • #5
          Brian T I totally agree and that's why I think the utility blade works. The steel behind the edge isn't thick but it has depth, nearly an inch, to support the edge. It's that fact that keeps me from trying the Murphy whittler, it has very little to support the edge so it had to hardened to a pretty high R number to keep it from bending and torquing. I'll have to look around here to see what old tool steel I might have laying around.

          Comment


          • #6
            Now just to be up front I seldom use a knife. But I research about a lot of different carvers and the tools and techniques they use. Just about any type of knife you can imagine some guy is using to create beautiful carvings. Short blades long blades fat blade thin blades I watched a video of a guy using what looks like a meat cleaver to do amazing work. I think knives are like girls I suggest you date a bunch of them before deciding who to marry. Just because Lynn uses a utility knife doesn’t mean you should, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t either. You got to figure out what works for you! Be a knife whore you’ll know when the right blade is in your hand and you’ll likely learn that there are advantages to different knives depending on the wood and the cut.
            Last edited by Nebraska; 09-17-2020, 10:08 PM.
            Ed
            https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
            Local club
            https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
              you’ll know when the right blade is in your hand and you’ll likely learn that there are advantages to different knives depending on the wood and the cut.
              Pacific Northwest First Nations carving knives are like that.
              You will need a few of different sweeps and sizes.

              Brian T

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tbox61 View Post
                I have one of Mike Shipley's old power hacksaw blade knives with a 1 3/8 blade, and had a 2" blade knife until Dallas Deege at Old Texas Woodcarvers traded me out of it. That was about as thin and as a flat grind on a production knife I have seen. Unfortunately, you can't get those knives made that way anymore, that is unless you happen to find one on Ebay...
                If I remember right, prior to OCC they were "Denny" brand, and prior to that, they were "Ron Wells". The old hacksaw-blade knives made by Wells have flat sides and a walnut handle with "RW" branded on them. These would be a nice addition to anyone's collection if you can find one. (I have 3 different sizes.)


                Squid-61 wrote: "It's that fact that keeps me from trying the Murphy whittler, it has very little to support the edge...."

                I have never owned or tried the Murphy whittler, but I do have their general purpose "carver" (bench knife). It has been (in my opinion) a standard de facto go-to knife for a lot of carvers for a very long time. I've owned the same one, and use it all the time, since 1980. It is also the knife I provide when teaching beginner classes. (They do need to be sharpened, as their "scary sharp" isn't.)
                That being said, if the "whittler" has the profile you're looking for, I would not think twice about getting one. With their history of making knives, I would find it hard to believe there isn't enough material to support the edge. They list for $13.20 on their web site.... for that price, you have very little to lose.
                ....Dave
                Old carvers never die... they just whittle away.
                www.shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dave.keele View Post

                  If I remember right, prior to OCC they were "Denny" brand, and prior to that, they were "Ron Wells". The old hacksaw-blade knives made by Wells have flat sides and a walnut handle with "RW" branded on them. These would be a nice addition to anyone's collection if you can find one. (I have 3 different sizes.)


                  Squid-61 wrote: "It's that fact that keeps me from trying the Murphy whittler, it has very little to support the edge...."

                  I have never owned or tried the Murphy whittler, but I do have their general purpose "carver" (bench knife). It has been (in my opinion) a standard de facto go-to knife for a lot of carvers for a very long time. I've owned the same one, and use it all the time, since 1980. It is also the knife I provide when teaching beginner classes. (They do need to be sharpened, as their "scary sharp" isn't.)
                  That being said, if the "whittler" has the profile you're looking for, I would not think twice about getting one. With their history of making knives, I would find it hard to believe there isn't enough material to support the edge. They list for $13.20 on their web site.... for that price, you have very little to lose.
                  I use a Murphy leather knife as my primary cutting tool for leather work, rarely needs more than a swipe or two on the strop and I do a fair amount of leather cutting. At its price it probably is worth giving the Whittler a shot, just hate to get into the mode of buying a lot of stuff that gets tossed aside.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have quite a few of the utility knives that Lynn uses and it really is a matter of learning to use what you have. It's not what you use, but how you use it. However, Helvie now makes a knife with a similar blade style and handle, only it is better steel and the blade is slightly longer. Now you can't replace the blade, it costs more than a utility knife, and there is currently a waiting list for Helvies of any kind! But here is a picture of mine! I have also made some fancy wooden handles for utility knife blades and just epoxied them in the handle.

                    IMG_3675.JPG

                    Attached Files
                    'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

                    http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
                    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
                    http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dave.keele View Post

                      If I remember right, prior to OCC they were "Denny" brand, and prior to that, they were "Ron Wells". The old hacksaw-blade knives made by Wells have flat sides and a walnut handle with "RW" branded on them. These would be a nice addition to anyone's collection if you can find one. (I have 3 different sizes.)
                      I believe Mike bought out Ron's business and made them just like Ron until he was no longer able to get the material for the blades that Ron used. I think he may have changed material around 2010-11? It was some time after that when he also bought Dennie Neubauer's business and started making gouges also. I think that's when the handles changed from walnut to oak. I have a couple of Shipley knives and a lot of OCCT gouges and hook knives. I have heard that people say they prefer Ron's, but I like what I have. It was the first sharp knife I owned, back in 2009. But I pretty much like all my knives!
                      'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

                      http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
                      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
                      http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mpounders View Post
                        I have quite a few of the utility knives that Lynn uses and it really is a matter of learning to use what you have. It's not what you use, but how you use it. However, Helvie now makes a knife with a similar blade style and handle, only it is better steel and the blade is slightly longer. Now you can't replace the blade, it costs more than a utility knife, and there is currently a waiting list for Helvies of any kind! But here is a picture of mine! I have also made some fancy wooden handles for utility knife blades and just epoxied them in the handle.

                        IMG_3675.JPG
                        Now that idea of making a wooden handled knife with a utility blade really intrigues me, whole lot easier than making a tool steel blade and handle. I would probably make a few handles in a batch since the utility blades won't last all that long. I wonder what mods I need to make to prevent it from being a copy of the Helvie? I'll have to experiment with some handle shapes that suit my arthritis.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sounds like a plan. It worked for me. I learned a lot about making my own knives and sharpening. The one with the birds is the original version of the top one in the pic of 4 knives. I liked the handle and wanted to make a chip carving knife. So I looked at the other knives on the market and printed one out to actual size and used it as a guide to make one. The blades are epoxied in place. On that one, I used a thin x-acto saw to remove the old blade which had seen it's day. I shortened the handle and slipped in a new blade after shaping it and leaving as much as I could for a tang--and I "sawtoothed" the tang to give it a zig-zag edge for the epoxy to hold onto.

                          I had fun.

                          BobL
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mpounders View Post
                            I believe Mike bought out Ron's business.... It was some time after that when he also bought Dennie Neubauer's business...
                            Thanks, Mike! I have no reason to doubt that you are correct. I own a Denny knife that looks identical to the current OCC version. I use to own a Shipley but sold it to another carver. It was not from the "hacksaw" era, or I would have kept it.

                            It would be fun to know the steel make-up for the hacksaws Ron Wells used. It's some of the hardest material used in any of my many knives, and I've yet to break a tip.... at least, not yet. ;>)
                            ....Dave
                            Old carvers never die... they just whittle away.
                            www.shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Squid-61 View Post

                              ... just hate to get into the mode of buying a lot of stuff that gets tossed aside.
                              Squid, Some of us old woodcarvers will tell you that we aren't really carvers at all!! ....we're carving knife collectors. ;>)

                              We just have to use them once in a while to convince the wife we needed to buy them in the first place.
                              ....Dave
                              Old carvers never die... they just whittle away.
                              www.shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X