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  • #16
    Originally posted by Squid-61 View Post

    ... since the utility blades won't last all that long. I wonder what mods I need to make to prevent it from being a copy of the Helvie? I'll have to experiment with some handle shapes that suit my arthritis.
    I think the blades lasting long is related to how it's used and how it's sharpened.... both can be overcome through experience. Some new carvers tend to use the knife point to pry, and not cut, wood out, resulting in a broken tip (meaning you then reshape the blade). Another problem some new carvers have is to think "sharpening" means using a stone, grinder, sandpaper, etc., to form a wire burr is required each time the blade/tool needs to be sharpened. This tendency removes too much material.

    I would not be concerned about creating a copy of the Helvie. In making tools for one's own use, just about anything goes.

    If you're interested in flat-sided blades already shaped, I know several carvers who make their own knives using Warren brand blades.... many shapes to chose from and they even have LH and RH curved (side bent) blades.

    https://gregdorrance.com/page/1/?s=warren&post_type=product
    Last edited by dave.keele; 09-20-2020, 07:18 AM.
    ....Dave
    Old carvers never die... they just whittle away.
    www.shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com

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    • #17
      Here is one I made a few years back. It is just a utility knife blade glued into a pine handle. I made a bunch for students to use and decided to decorate this one a little.
      16716187_1355558891175458_819037784034963691_o.jpg
      'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

      http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
      http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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      • #18
        Don't develop a fixation about the blade being center-hafted.

        Pacific Northwest style flat knives are surface hafted and no, they don't work loose.

        https://www.jamie-sharp.com/

        The easiest and most accessible crooked knives?
        Buy RH and LLH pairs of farrier's hoof trimming knives.
        Revise the bevels to 12 degrees from 25 degrees.
        Open the hook with a 7/16" chainsaw file and you get wonderful scorps in the deal.
        I've done a couple dozen of these, not at all tricky.

        The best crooked knife blades are made by the blade smiths of the Pacific Northwest.
        Brian T

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Brian T View Post
          Don't develop a fixation about the blade being center-hafted.

          Pacific Northwest style flat knives are surface hafted and no, they don't work loose.

          https://www.jamie-sharp.com/

          The easiest and most accessible crooked knives?
          Buy RH and LLH pairs of farrier's hoof trimming knives.
          Revise the bevels to 12 degrees from 25 degrees.
          Open the hook with a 7/16" chainsaw file and you get wonderful scorps in the deal.
          I've done a couple dozen of these, not at all tricky.

          The best crooked knife blades are made by the blade smiths of the Pacific Northwest.
          UK knifemaker Ben Orford makes a hooked knife that way, I'll have to review his video. I have heavy gauge nylon fish net cord that would work well as lashing.

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          • #20
            Taking these tips and some concepts from Ben Orford, I think my approach would be a center hafted blade but with a fitted space and cover for the blade, a peg to retain the blade and lashing to hold it all together. The reason I didn't go with a traditional side blade mount is the lack of a tang to secure the blade. I'll try to draw something up to see if it all works. Not as easy as buying a utility knife handle but a lot more fun.

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            • #21
              The cord commonly used in the Pacific Northwest for whipping is #18 tarred nylon seine line. There's about 1,000' on a 1 lb spool (I'm well into spool #2). I buy from a fishnet supply company on the coast. Ought to be a couple of places in Whitby, NYorks. Yellow, pink and white is also available, locally called surveyor's cord. Same technique as whipping the line guides on custom fishing rods.
              Brian T

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