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  • Another knife

    The cutting edge is 2" long. The handle is teak (no finish). I found out from this build that I like a thicker and wider handle than this, and a harder or heavier wood. This knife is pretty light weight. I had a scrap piece of teak about 3/4" thick that I resawed down, notched out for the tang, and glued back together. The nice thing about resawing wood that you plan to glue back together is that the cut can be rough and it'll still fit back together perfectly.
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    This gallery has 6 photos.
    Anders.
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

  • #2
    Ah. Thanks for the pictures, I see how it is made. What a cool knife.
    You can cut the handle scales to anything you like. I didn't understand that before.
    Sitting on another knife edge, where is the balance point?

    One knife-building concept that I use, I have taken to calling the "Kestrel Constant."
    I named it for the blade-smiths at Kestrel Tool who first described it.
    This is the size of the handle which will not hurt you in a day's carving.

    It's kind of a Pacific Northwest First Nations wood carving tool thing.

    Palm up, fist grip.
    The tips of your second and third fingers should just touch the fat ball part of your thumb.
    After considerable experiment, I learned that the shaft diameter for me is ideally 7/8" x 7/8".
    This applies to elbow and D adzes as well. I carve the rest of the handles any size that looks OK but the part I actually hold is 7/8". 3/4 is small, 1" is too big, I'll shave it down.
    I did not believe that I would feel it but I do. Easily.
    Brian T

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Brian T View Post
      Ah. Thanks for the pictures, I see how it is made. What a cool knife.
      You can cut the handle scales to anything you like. I didn't understand that before.
      Sitting on another knife edge, where is the balance point?

      One knife-building concept that I use, I have taken to calling the "Kestrel Constant."
      I named it for the blade-smiths at Kestrel Tool who first described it.
      This is the size of the handle which will not hurt you in a day's carving.

      It's kind of a Pacific Northwest First Nations wood carving tool thing.

      Palm up, fist grip.
      The tips of your second and third fingers should just touch the fat ball part of your thumb.
      After considerable experiment, I learned that the shaft diameter for me is ideally 7/8" x 7/8".
      This applies to elbow and D adzes as well. I carve the rest of the handles any size that looks OK but the part I actually hold is 7/8". 3/4 is small, 1" is too big, I'll shave it down.
      I did not believe that I would feel it but I do. Easily.
      Thanks Brian. I like 7/8" thick as well. The balance point is right behind that finger bump.....where your middle finger would rest. I'm from the PNW too. Wa state.
      Anders.
      https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

      Comment


      • #4
        Very nice knife Anders,looks very comfortable.
        Mark N. Akers
        My Etsy Store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/KarolinaKarver

        Comment


        • #5
          Anders,

          Yep that’s how it’s done. Good looking knife! I like the idea of using the flexible filet blade. Can you describe the carving characteristics?

          Comment


          • #6
            Well done. I have never made a blade. I have purchased a few and made handles to fit my grip. I also like the thicker handle.
            We live in the land of the free because of the brave! Semper Fi
            https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

            Comment


            • #7
              Knowing the size, I can feel that handle.
              I hope that your description is encouragement for many more carvers to make tools of their own.
              Brian T

              Comment


              • #8
                Well done, if it cuts as well as it looks, you have got a real keeper. When I make a knife, I do about the same as you did with the handle. the only difference= before I clean out the area for the tang, I take one side of the wood, place it against the tang and drill a hole for the rivet, Pin It, then drill the second hole. then I place the two halves together and drill the other side of the handle, helps keep the surprises to a minimum. with the holes in the handle, it makes removing the wood for the tang more precise. Again just my 2¢.
                . . .JoeB

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
                  Anders,

                  Yep that’s how it’s done. Good looking knife! I like the idea of using the flexible filet blade. Can you describe the carving characteristics?
                  Thanks Ed. The blade came from a boning knife so it's not as flexible as a fillet knife I believe. It feels like it has a standard amount of flex to it.....if that makes sense. I have only tested it on scrap basswood. I haven't actually carved anything with it yet.
                  Anders.
                  https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                    Knowing the size, I can feel that handle.
                    I hope that your description is encouragement for many more carvers to make tools of their own.
                    Thanks Brian. I have always like making tools. This is the 2nd knife I've made. Making a paper pattern for the handle and blade helped.
                    Attached Files
                    Anders.
                    https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                      Well done, if it cuts as well as it looks, you have got a real keeper. When I make a knife, I do about the same as you did with the handle. the only difference= before I clean out the area for the tang, I take one side of the wood, place it against the tang and drill a hole for the rivet, Pin It, then drill the second hole. then I place the two halves together and drill the other side of the handle, helps keep the surprises to a minimum. with the holes in the handle, it makes removing the wood for the tang more precise. Again just my 2¢.
                      Thanks Joe. Your way is definitely better. I will try that next time, I just need to get a small drill press to make it easier. Thanks for the tip!
                      Anders.
                      https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mark N. Akers View Post
                        Very nice knife Anders,looks very comfortable.
                        Thanks Mark. I saw your signature series 1 knives on Helvie's website. They look nice. I like your handle style and blade length. I would like to get one someday. I'll trade you
                        Last edited by 4ND3R5; 10-13-2020, 05:54 PM.
                        Anders.
                        https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Randy View Post
                          Well done. I have never made a blade. I have purchased a few and made handles to fit my grip. I also like the thicker handle.
                          Thanks Randy. A friend gave me a dremal tool so it was pretty easy to cut with a small cut off wheel. Just remember to go slow.
                          Anders.
                          https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My folks had a small custom meat processing plant from the time I was six, I kind of thought that might be a Dexter boning knife, had one in my hand since I was six years old. I finally broke the tip off it while carving, mad a small detail knife ou to the tip, you will not be sorry.
                            . . .JoeB

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My pattern, if you could call it that, is the best of the knife handles that I've made in the past.
                              I had cedar and tools one day to study the old knives in the UBC Museum of Anthropology.
                              Then, I'd run outside and carve like crazy to make full scale models of the handles in the collection.

                              Always use Dremel cut off wheels. I stocked up on aftermarket ones.
                              They explode and sting so badly that I bought a full-face shield (and Dremel disks).

                              I've modified a dozen+ farrier's knives for wood carving.
                              With the Dremel, I cut a dotted line and go back over it, again and again.
                              Have not cooked one yet. Rough sharpening with chainsaw files.
                              Brian T

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