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What did you replace your fine India with?

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  • Jamie Sharp
    replied
    Have you considered wood and polishing compound?

    Green is 2000~ grit, black is 600~800 grit.

    Works great on curved knives as you can always sand wood to the shape you need, or sand out any nicks in the wood as needed. Cheap too! And if it gets dirty/damaged you can just toss it out and make a new one for pennies.

    Leave a comment:


  • pallin
    replied
    Hi Ank - I started whittling with a pocket knife many years ago. Much of this was on long backpacking trips, so I used a small carborundum pocket stone for sharpening. When I moved on to relief carving with gouges, I switched to Arkansas stones, both medium and hard, with honing oil. Now I use wet-or-dry sandpapers and finish with chromium oxide on cardboard. So the only India I've used is India ink.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Two things, Ank

    You find very fine grained stones in rivers here because they are too hard to grind up into rock dust powder. The game is to search for stones of the right size and shape for the curve, the sweep, of the knife. I have a few and I'll never stop looking. Our mountain rivers get rearranged by spring flooding every year so there's always millions of new stones to look at!

    It's very difficult to find and buy fine sharpening stones here. Files, yes. Carborundum for axes, yes. Steels for kitchen knives, yes. Not much else. If I can find them for free in a riverbed, good.

    7-8 years ago, I think, I switched from the common gouges and mallets to the tools used by the First Nations here in the Pacific Northwest. For the most part, the knives have many different curvatures and so do the adze blades. I had nothing but water stones and diamond plates that could not fit to the sweeps of the tools. The 3M fine automotive wet & dry finishing sandpapers are easily flexible enough for all my knife edges. I go only as far as 1500, I think the sheets run up to 2500 if my memory serves. I secure the blades and move the abrasives.

    Here's an example of the blade sweeps:

    Buy Sharp Curved & Straight Wood Carving Knife Online

    I like the CrOx/AlOx honing compound that I scribble on file cards to wrap around pipe mandrels for honing. For the sweeps of the adze blades, a tennis ball has just the right radius!

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  • Ånk
    replied
    Thanks Brian.
    I uploaded some pictures in the welcoming/introduction thread, please have a look mate!


    Please tell me more about those select river stones, never heard of them. From what country and what river? If somethings "select" then usually it's offered along with something more "standard". Perhaps you've tried those too.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but you seem to prefer not to use a fine India, but go the sandpaper route. Why?

    ​​​

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Welcome. Show us your carvings some time.

    You will be using select river stones and sandpapers of you carve with adzes and crooked knives.
    Then, the edge is stationary and the abrasive moves.

    Photographs show that steel is so thin and flexible that 1500 grit is about the limit. Next I use CrOx/AlOx (or the palm of one of my dirty gloves.) My strops vary from worn out chainsaw files to water pipe and tennis balls.

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  • Ånk
    started a topic What did you replace your fine India with?

    What did you replace your fine India with?

    ... Or did you?

    ​​​

    Ive been searching for those 4x2 or longer slipstones to use as a compliment and while being far away from the bigger bench stones I have.
    These things can be problematic for many reasons especially if your on a tight budget and the most apparent problems are:

    don't want to buy crap

    Don't want to get ripped off

    The price for material and shipping needs to be as good as possible.
    ​​​​
    So why India?
    I got a second hand India combo from my fiance that really has grown on me.
    It's defenetly not the fastest stone out there but that's partly what's makes it good. And maintainence is pretty unproblematic, and when it gets burnished, take the pain a bit and grease your elbows and that's it, you've got a good stone that's as flat or round as you need it to be. And the pricetag is good.
    So I thaught, why not a smaller one for field use, a kinda midrange stone for sharpening on the fly.

    So. With that said, I would of course, respectfully, like to ask the folks here, a couple of questions based on this:

    You who when needed, go to your lo, mid or high grit India stones, why do you keep doing it? What's your reasons?

    And you who take another route stonewise, what do you do instead and with what? Why don't you embrace the Indias?

    Just to be clear, sharpening and honing can be done in many ways.
    I choose stones, and strops if needed.
    I live familylife in a apartment with so benchgrinder, waterweel and rotating strop is really not my cup of tea, and is pretty impossible. And some good stones that gives you good feeling are way better than "gadgets".

    Some people take the sandpaper route, but I don't. I'm not that kinda guy I guess. Sure it's handy sometimes for certain things, but I don't want it as a base for what I'm doing. Good stones, and in this case, slipstones, makes more sense to me for a number of reasons.

    So, without terrorizing you any further, enjoy you day and get back to me if you can.



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