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  • Sharpening water or oil ?

    So I am going to get a couple of good stones, and am wondering which is most popular used method of lubricant for this. I will be using on my gouges and hand chisels.
    Thanks Chuck
    Chuck
    Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

    https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

  • #2
    The water or oil is not a lubricant to reduce friction.
    It is used to flush away the "swarf", a $2 word for bits of metal and smashed abrasive particles.
    This keep the abrasive surface free and clear of debris so it cuts at a predictable particle grit size.

    Carborundum stones in the 60-80-120-150-180-220 grit sizes benefit from oil and a mop-up with a paper towel.
    Water stones are exactly that. Either natural or a bar of grit+adhesive binder. Water washing works really well. Flood the stone as you work.

    3M and others make silicon carbide wet&dry fine sandpapers for finishing automotive paint surfaces.
    These are also excellent for sharpening wood carving tools.
    I could use them wet but it's much more practical to go dry to sharpen crooked knives and adzes.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Brian T View Post
      The water or oil is not a lubricant to reduce friction.
      It is used to flush away the "swarf", a $2 word for bits of metal and smashed abrasive particles.
      This keep the abrasive surface free and clear of debris so it cuts at a predictable particle grit size.

      Carborundum stones in the 60-80-120-150-180-220 grit sizes benefit from oil and a mop-up with a paper towel.
      Water stones are exactly that. Either natural or a bar of grit+adhesive binder. Water washing works really well. Flood the stone as you work.

      3M and others make silicon carbide wet&dry fine sandpapers for finishing automotive paint surfaces.
      These are also excellent for sharpening wood carving tools.
      I could use them wet but it's much more practical to go dry to sharpen crooked knives and adzes.
      Thanks Brian T, love the "$2" word ya got there. And I just got off the phone with a fellow at an outfit that makes stones for carving too. Great info and as you said it was to flush and water in his view was the better way? So flushing away I go.
      Cheers
      Chuck
      Chuck
      Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

      https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a 1K and a 4K water stone and a 1K and 4K hand-held "slip" stones.
        I enjoyed working with them all. For Euro gouges and straight knives, excellent results.

        However, I can't effectively do crooked knife bevels and adze bevels. So I had to switch to using the fine sandpapers, wrapped around all sorts of cylinder forms.

        Make some sort of a mount for the stones that you can clamp to the bench.
        From time to time, rub and rinse off the water stone in a bucket of water.

        SpokeoilS.jpg Finish 5 35small.jpg
        Brian T

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        • #5
          I'm old fashion and use Arkansas oil stones...with diluted mineral oil, Chuck. Seems to fit my needs.yet a bit "messy."
          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #6
            I have all the above. Honestly I seldom get any of the stones out anymore. If a tool needs that much work I’m reaching for the sandpaper. Lots of grit options and I can by a lot of paper for the cost of one good stone. Plus stones wear and require truing from time to time. One more thing cutting into my carving, fishing or golf time.

            Ed
            https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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