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Kirschen knife for whittling

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  • Kirschen knife for whittling

    Hello woodcarvers, I have a newbie question. Will it be too much hassle to whittle with these kind of knives, in terms of their edge profile... I thought the first one for details and the second as a roughout or general carving. My work would be small baswood wood spirits, tiki faces, nordic gods and similar stuff, from 5-8 inches... Now, I am in a part of Europe where there is not any choice, so I will be purchasing these online. Other solutions are Flexcut, Beavercraft and Mora, but Kirschen is, at least here, by far well known of these, and it will be the cheapest purchase. Also, watching people work with flexcut, it just seams to fragile, and not for me while on the other hand Mora might be to chunky (laminated steel 120 and 122). My main problem is I cannot test any of these knives, so I would like honest opinions what would be the way to go?
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  • #2
    Hi I started with a swissarmy pocket knife, then used a similar knife like this one on your first photo.
    Brian T of this forum had a thread about making your own knife out of old material, worn out jigsaw blades or other Stuff like this.
    Now I made 3 on my own and I am glad about doing so.
    You can make the blade like you want to have it and you can change it the way you think it's better.
    You won't do this with an expensive, bought knife.

    All you need is a dremel or a tool like this, a sharpening stone and some stuff for honing.
    But make sure you use material that is not too hard. For carving knives the blade has to be a little bit flexible so it wont break when you use it in a to rough way if this happens.
    Brian T may have some more and better advice.
    my 2cents from a newbie in this forum.
    Last edited by wasserretter; 05-12-2021, 03:51 PM. Reason: correcting members name
    If you don't like to call me wasserretter call me Dirk

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    • #3
      I have boughten knives & self-made knives. The best steel I've found to make my knives out of is replacement scraper blades. I wish I could remember where I got the one bunch that is thin and super flexible, and they hold an edge great. With these, you don't have to forge, quench to harden, the anneal to reduce the brittleness. The only thing you have to worry about is burning the blade while cutting it out. I get around that by using a 4x4x12 piece of lumber, which I keep wet and well spraying the metal to keep it cool while cutting. I just put the steel on the wet block and cut the pattern I want with a Dremel cut-off burr.

      Not all the knives I've made turn out as I wished, but it was a good learning experience, and then I would make one that I like.

      A good knife is a pleasure to use, but one that you made is even better.

      Again just my 2¢
      . . .JoeB

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      • #4
        Kirschen. Better known in North America as Two Cherries. I wonder why? Nice labels.

        Some carvers like thin blades that flex a little. 9/64" = .078" = 2 mm.
        Other carvers want thicker blades for big chips and rough shaping 3/32" = .094" = 2.4 mm.
        Probably need one of each?

        They will be good steel. That means that they will not be too difficult to sharpen and they should keep a "carving sharp" edge for at least 30 minutes of steady work.

        You will need some very fine sharpening supplies (to 1500 grit) and a strop with honing compound.
        The end is to make an edge which is at least as sharp as a scalpel.
        As other carvers have noted above, there's a great pleasure in making a knife of your own.
        Probably need to carve with somebody else's knife to learn what the shape of the handle and the blade need to be for your hands and what you do.

        Can you find the stainless steel gloves that butchers and fishers wear to protect their hands from knife cuts? Wood carving tools will cut you to the bone.

        Good luck and welcome to wood carving and to the WCI forums.














        Brian T

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        • #5
          Chuck,

          Sadly knives seem a rather personal preference. I can almost guarantee that for almost any knife you ask about there will be carvers who will tell you it’s their favorite and would be lost without it. Simultaneously someone else will tell you they tried one of those and will never buy another.

          I tend to think of carving knives like dating in high school you’re probably going on lots of dates before you find one you want to take home to meet your parents.

          Now I have never used a Two Cherries knife but own some of their gouges and they certainly have a reputation for using great steel. Cannot image you could go too wrong making that your choice.

          I found Mora’s to be just way more blade then I needed. Flexcut are kind of thick and lack flexibility. Beavercraft is a flexcut clone so I would expect the same issues.

          Just my opinion.
          Ed
          https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
          Local club
          https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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          • #6
            Those will work great. Two cherries are good tools. As Ed said If you stay with it you will most likely end up with a draw full of carving knives. For a number of years I tried a new one every year or so. I will never have to buy a new one again. But then there is always a chance I will have to try a new one because it new. It is like eating chips, Hard to stop with just one!!
            We live in the land of the free because of the brave!

            https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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            • #7
              My thought is only buy the knife on the left. That knife will not only detail but if sharp, you can hog off some wood also. I wouldn’t even have a use myself for knife on the right. Because the blade is wider, as person would think it’s the one for heavier work, but here is the problem with it. Your index finger on knife one will be very close to the blade, so is the blade is 1-1/2”, you will be able to apply more pressure to the blade than with the knife on the right. Because of the way the blade is mounted and type of handle, you won’t be able to apply as much pressure slicing as the left knife and with less control. Too much talking here, but you only need the one knife for quite a while.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Curly Early View Post
                My thought is only buy the knife on the left. That knife will not only detail but if sharp, you can hog off some wood also. I wouldn’t even have a use myself for knife on the right. Because the blade is wider, as person would think it’s the one for heavier work, but here is the problem with it. Your index finger on knife one will be very close to the blade, so is the blade is 1-1/2”, you will be able to apply more pressure to the blade than with the knife on the right. Because of the way the blade is mounted and type of handle, you won’t be able to apply as much pressure slicing as the left knife and with less control. Too much talking here, but you only need the one knife for quite a while.
                Good plan!
                Ed
                https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
                Local club
                https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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                • #9
                  Thank you all for your answers and comments. Unfortunately, as I don't have designated space for my hobby, and lack of experience, selfmade knife is a complicated project. The main question for me, in this case, was that Two cherries might be specially designed for chip carving, and therefore for some reason, unknown to me, might not be suitable for whittling. I think the more I read about these the more confusion is for me. I will start with the first one, and see where I end up.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chuck boris View Post
                    Thank you all for your answers and comments. Unfortunately, as I don't have designated space for my hobby, and lack of experience, selfmade knife is a complicated project. The main question for me, in this case, was that Two cherries might be specially designed for chip carving, and therefore for some reason, unknown to me, might not be suitable for whittling. I think the more I read about these the more confusion is for me. I will start with the first one, and see where I end up.
                    Two Cherries does make chip carving specific knives. The knives you have selected while they could be used in chip carving they are not chip carving specific knives but design.

                    Here are the knives I keep at my bench laid out left to right by how often I use that blade.
                    A15EA71A-DDE0-451F-9CB6-716D363FA562.jpeg
                    Ed
                    https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
                    Local club
                    https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Nebraska View Post

                      Two Cherries does make chip carving specific knives. The knives you have selected while they could be used in chip carving they are not chip carving specific knives but design.

                      Here are the knives I keep at my bench laid out left to right by how often I use that blade.
                      A15EA71A-DDE0-451F-9CB6-716D363FA562.jpeg
                      Most helpfull... Thank you!

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                      • #12
                        Making knives by yourself it's that difficult it's no magic.
                        I needed some scrap wood for carving the handle, some shoemaker's linen, some "UHU hart" glue and some "Ponal" white glue (I hope you know these glue brands and sorts of glue).
                        Old worn out blades of jigsaws maybe those bigger ones.
                        The first is a little hard to finish the next are much easier.
                        selfmadeknives.jpg ​​​​​​
                        Here are the three I already made.
                        The two on the left side are made out of a bigger jigsaw blade, the one on the right side is a small one.
                        The price was approximate 1€ per knife.
                        Ok they aren't that good looking like those bought knives but the are doing what they shall do.
                        Besides you are doing good for the environment.
                        I do not want to convert anyone to make knives themselves from now on but I am very fond of this idea.
                        If you don't like to call me wasserretter call me Dirk

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                        • #13
                          Suggesty viewing the following video on YouTube.....


                          Let's Talk Carving Knives - Doug Linker

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1MMTKRL_PI

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                          • #14
                            The first one should be fine, but I don't care for the handle on the second. It would roll off your table/bench easily.
                            'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

                            http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
                            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
                            http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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                            • #15
                              Just a few thoughts and then I will go back under my wood pile.

                              The bench knife on the right will serve as a knife for any carving. The only requirements is for the handle to be comfortable and the blade to be sharp.

                              The second thought is if you have a fixed blade utility knife also called a box cutter available to you where you are located, try it. They're not that expensive, the blades can be stropped and/or then thrown away and replaced, and they can be quite useful when roughing (removing excess wood) on a carving. There is a manLynn Doughty, in the USA who is known for carving fantastic caricatures with a utility knife which he calls Ol' Reliable as I do to. Here's a link to his video on Ol' Reliable: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uDchnpdEXU At one time he was quite active here on the WCI forum. https://outwestgallery.com

                              Finally, as long as it is safe for you and you are comfortable doing it, do be afraid to break the rules of woodcarving--you know the ones where people say "you should do it this way". I carve with different tools that some would say is not correct or that's not woodcarving. I say if it works for you, do it.

                              BobL

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