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  • Bandsaw

    I've seen any number of bandsaw threads here, and thought this post I ran across had some merit.

    HANDHELD BANDSAW GETS STANDUP CONVERSION WITH SCRAP LUMBER

    9 Comments
    October 11, 2021

    Handheld band saws exist, and can be highly useful tools. However, they lack some of the finesse and precision of the more traditional upright units, particularly for with smaller workpieces. [Honus] set about rectifying this, building a stand for their DeWalt handheld bandsaw out of scrap lumber.

    The stand consists of some hefty wooden beams sawn to length and screwed together to make a support for the bandsaw. A nice 1/4″ thick aluminium plate is installed as a baseplate for cutting.

    Then, the handheld bandsaw itself is attached to the rig, held in place with a bolt and a large zip tie. The zip tie is fastened around the trigger, holding it down all the time. Then, a switched powerboard is used to turn the saw on and off as needed. Importantly, simply cutting a ziptie and removing a bolt is enough to restore the handheld saw to its original purpose.

    It’s a tidy build and one that makes an existing tool more useful for minimal extra cost. We’ve actually seen bandsaws built from scratch, too. If you’re cooking up your own great hacks in the home shop, be sure to let us know!

    the original article is here: Handheld Bandsaw Gets Standup Conversion With Scrap Lumber | Hackaday
    Buffalo Bif
    www.bflobif.com

  • #2

    Human creativity has no limits apparently? But given that handheld bands saws and a basic bench top bandsaw are comparable in price I find myself wondering Why?

    Just keep thinking of a high speed exposed blade near my hands secured by a zip tie. Not that I haven’t done a boatload of stupid things in my life, but going to pass on this one.

    31FDC4C4-6D70-4E97-8ABD-664819B6BFFC.jpeg
    Ed
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
    Local club
    https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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    • #3
      For one thing look at the direction of the blade....the cut piece of wood has what four inches before you hit the wood into the back...great if you cutting two-inch piece of wood? The way I see it is worthless unless your are cutting extreme small pieces. You can not rip on this, you can not have much of a curve, and again when you push your wood into it without hitting the back....it is so limited in its usage. Not worth it in my books of opinions. The normal bandsaw blade does not run in this direction for tons of reasons. As stated this bandsaw was being used to cut metal pieces which I could see it being used for that reason.

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      • #4
        These are generally for cutting off metal. I don’t see much use for carvers, as you only have about 4” of clearance, and the blade is at 90 degrees from a normal bandsaw. You could only rip a 4 inch board. Would work ok for cutting off crossgrain sections. Maybe.
        If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

        www.spokanecarvers.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Tom Ellis View Post
          These are generally for cutting off metal. I don’t see much use for carvers, as you only have about 4” of clearance, and the blade is at 90 degrees from a normal bandsaw. You could only rip a 4 inch board. Would work ok for cutting off crossgrain sections. Maybe.
          Tom who rips four inches? Laughing out loud. Yea looks like we were typing the same thing at the same time.... hope you are not freezing over there yet...good to see you! I could have used that saw although when I was cutting that pipe for fence poles and other metal chop-off jobs but the price you have to use the saw a lot to get your payback in usage.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Di, It does look like we were typing at the same time. I agree with what you said. Has a very limited use for a woodcarver as far as I am concerned.
            Been having freezing temps for the past three nights, so looks like I had better start looking for my snow shovel.
            If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

            www.spokanecarvers.com

            Comment


            • #7
              It's intended primarily for metal-cutting. As such, the holding stand is a good idea for cutting off small pieces of metal in the shop. Thanks for p0sting the links! But for woodcarvers, anything smaller than a 9 inch throat is not very useful. Home Depot, for instance, has 4 different 9 inch bandsaws for cutting wood that are under $200.00 - a couple are under $150.00. If you get one, just do yourself a favor and buy a Timberwolf blade from http://www.suffolkmachinery.com It tracks straight and cuts nice tight circles which most blades do not do... I have a Timberwolf 3/16 x 4tpi on my 9 inch saw and a 1/4 x 4tpi on my 14 inch saw and would not use anything else.

              Claude
              My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
              My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/
              My Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/claudeswoodcarving/
              My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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              • #8
                Looks like it would be a great improvement over my 2" throated B&D scroll saw. However, I've really got no place to put one even if I had the motivation. For what I do a Japanese style double cut saw works just fine.

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