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Various mallets pros and cons

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  • #16
    I will note....for myself mallet work does not work in some woods, for example... black ebony that needs power tools and major patience. I have had some woods that are like stone also ...talk about going nowhere! Way I see it where there is the will ...there is a way.
    . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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    • #17
      Originally posted by NoDNA View Post
      OH,Boy those wood kill my wrists and hands. Here is mine I made, the head is 2.5" x 3.5' long weighs about 1/2 pound. the handle is 13' long made from a cactus spine I brought back from Mexico. It gives me enough power to buy a chisel Ok for me and light enough for the lighter tools too. Oh and Good to see you Dileon, I must get my pic changed, HA no one could stand it! IMG_1406.jpg
      Chuck
      Great I love to see people who make their own tools! PS no said anything about your picture!!!! LOL I have a few mallets of this shape....one has a leather head, and a smaller rubber... each one used for different reasons
      . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dileon View Post

        Great I love to see people who make their own tools! PS no said anything about your picture!!!! LOL I have a few mallets of this shape....one has a leather head, and a smaller rubber... each one used for different reasons
        Thanks Gal..One suggested to put leather on it,, but I like the sound? Leather is for and rubber?
        Chuck
        Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

        https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

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        • #19
          OH and Dileon I use all tools on Soapstone but hav enot tackled any other.. Suggestions?
          Chuck
          Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

          https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

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          • #20
            I don't have a mallet around, afraid Pam might use it
            . . .JoeB

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            • #21
              There is no good or bad about using a mallet. It is a really useful tool if you need or want to use it. Most carvers I know that teach carving have one in the tool box.
              We live in the land of the free because of the brave! Semper Fi
              https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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              • #22
                Originally posted by NoDNA View Post

                Thanks Gal..One suggested to put leather on it,, but I like the sound? Leather is for and rubber?
                The rawhide leather one is solid leather-wrapped from the core to the outside, is for those tools that are fragile, where if you pound too hard they break.. leather moves and is soft will let you use on the tool without damage ...hopeful if you are not heavy-handed... Rubber is great for reduction of sound basically for the neighbors...smile, and less damage to wood carving tools and does not slide off a tool easily. the con of these tools is they do get busted up so need to be replaced if used a lot.

                Stone carving....is another whole new ball game. Proper breakage is the name of the game. Had a whole class on it and I hated it !.... as I told people I do not have that kind of patience.
                Last edited by DiLeon; 11-16-2021, 03:25 PM.
                . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                  I don't have a mallet around, afraid Pam might use it
                  I bet you do not have any iron frying pans in the house either!!! So this is a major con having a mallet if got Joes problem....
                  Last edited by DiLeon; 11-16-2021, 03:36 PM.
                  . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                  • #24
                    Thanks for beginning this thread, Dileon - lots of good info here.

                    Claude
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
                    My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/
                    My Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/claudeswoodcarving/
                    My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                    • #25
                      Great thread Di. As a former maker of Wood is Good mallets, I am partial to them. I have spent hours and hours pressing them onto handles etc. I am glad that they went to the green from the dark ones. The new ones look nicer, at least to me. I use the 18oz version and have a small brass headed one as well. Haven't done any large pieces since my accident. The last piece I did using a mallet was a Santa out of Catalpa a few years ago. He stands about 30" high. Catalpa Log Santa (original work from Chainsaw roughout).jpg Done from a chainsaw "roughout".
                      Last edited by Steve Reed; 11-17-2021, 12:16 AM. Reason: spellimg
                      Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!

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                      • #26
                        I'm with Nebraska! I've never really used a wooden mallet and when I do use one it's the wooden mallet that I imported from my leathercraft days so it's not a conventional woodcarving mallet. Looks more like Chucks!

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                        • #27
                          IMG_0141.jpgThis is my bench holder for my mallets also holds burrs while I working and misc. items. This is most of the woodcarving mallets....some mallets are in other craft buckets.

                          When I need to gently "persuade" a chisel then I will use the light, slender mallet. One of the reasons that we carvers use round mallets, by the way, doesn't have all that much to do with accurate strikes - it's because there are often-encountered situations where the carving tool must be held in such a way that the mallet has to be swung at weird angles, and it'd be really difficult and unwieldy to use a joiner's mallet with a flat face to do that kind of work.

                          However, when I need to work with Japanese, dovetail chisels, or a large wide good chisel. These chisels need to be wacked with authority. Which need a heavier duty mallet heavier such as LV mallet, as often weight and balance is thought out nicely.

                          You generally want to save your chisel handles so you use a softer mallet than the handles. If you use a steel hammer on regular chisels, the end of the chisel handles will get mushroomed pretty well, including possible splitting. If you make your own chisel handles, you can replace the handles when they get damaged, but most people choose a softer mallet and spare the chisel handles.
                          Last edited by DiLeon; 11-17-2021, 01:16 PM.
                          . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                          • #28
                            IMG_0145.jpgPalm style Brass mallets are lightweight, secure, and ideal for many things. You can also use this hammer for gunsmithing. These mallets are a piece of art built to support the jewelry, leatherworker, woodworker, mechanic, machinist work. Brass mallets are typically used in a situation where one does not want to deform the object being struck. Being slightly softer than steel, it will not cause a steel shaft to mushroom with repeated blows. It will also not produce a spark when striking other objects. With the bronze or brass mallet, all that is needed is a light-controlled tap.

                            My brass mallets are compact and delicate in the hand. The brass mallet is a special little piece I think. I like it because it really affords a lot of different holding/striking positions. I can grasp the head, work from either side,..great balance and control. It fits my hand nicely. Some of the fancy ones are, but most are affordable. The carving tools are a little more delicate and I do reserve the brass mallet for them. Sometimes you have to hit in awkward positions to accommodate the grain when carving and the mallet excels at that issue.


                            These are ideal if you have arthritis…easy on the hands, wrist and shoulder…. do not have to hard grip and push chisels all day. Just easy tap.

                            I have two small Shop Foxes brass mallets and two new J Smiths… which have more little more weight and are bigger. The new ones I got from John Smith who is on this forum, he makes them with beautiful handles and I am very happy with them! Prices are right and handles can be made to size. You can PM him. Also John makes some really nice chip knives. He has a few unusual shape knives I could use in deep relief work.

                            These are my favorite mallets, as they can be used for lots of things where a full mallet or hammer is just not OK in wood carving.




                            . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Eddy-Smiles View Post
                              I'm with Nebraska! I've never really used a wooden mallet and when I do use one it's the wooden mallet that I imported from my leathercraft days so it's not a conventional woodcarving mallet. Looks more like Chucks!
                              No such thing anymore with conventional tools, I saw a video a day ago....this guy was actually using a small log with bark and all.... as a mallet on his wood carving. I sat there and laughed he was darn good with it, and fast at using it on his chisels. IF I could figure out how to post that video, I would have put it on here.
                              . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                              • #30
                                Just back one Di, and saw the one of yours.. It is easy for me to use with the longer hand and small head. Ghessh if I had all those I wood have no room for chips n dust.. Cheers Chuck
                                Chuck
                                Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

                                https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

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