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  • Tormek

    I am getting back into carving after a 20-year break. I am going to be slowly buying a variety of Pfeil tools. I no longer have a bench grinder and am thinking about getting a Tormek for sharpening. I have used a friend’s T-8 and loved it. I am looking at the T-4 due to cost factors. My goal is to eventually carve gunstocks.

    Am I making a mistake with the T-4?

    Does the T-4 use all of the same jigs as the T-8?

    What jigs will I need for Gouges, skews and V tools?

    Last, if memory serves me, Pfeil was about the best tool available for the money. Is that still so?

  • #2
    I would highly recommend the Burke Tote for your sharpening needs. https://westernwoodcarvers.com/product/tote/

    There are many tools equal to the Pfeil Swiss Mades but the only tools I consider superior are Diobsud Forge and they haven’t been made for decades. The big attraction with Pfeil is they have the widest section of profiles and sizes.

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    • #3
      Take a look at TomZ slow and easy
      . . .JoeB

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      • #4
        The great thing about Tormeks' are all the additional jigs you can buy to hold things at precise angles and the slow speed to keep from harming your tools. That is also the bad thing about the Tormeks! They are slow and require a lot of attachments? Many swear by them and the Tomz sharpener also. But I think a lot of sharpening involves just learning how to use a particular process, one that works for you. Tormeks should be faster than sharpening entirely by hand and may help you keep a consistent angle with the right jig. I use the Burke sharpener. It is faster but requires you to sharpen tools free hand rather than using jigs.
        'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

        http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
        http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
          I would highly recommend the Burke Tote for your sharpening needs. https://westernwoodcarvers.com/product/tote/

          There are many tools equal to the Pfeil Swiss Mades ....
          . What other tools do you consider equal. I would like to find good quality tools maybe a bit cheaper than Pfeil.


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          • #6
            Originally posted by mpounders View Post
            The great thing about Tormeks' are all the additional jigs you can buy to hold things at precise angles and the slow speed to keep from harming your tools. That is also the bad thing about the Tormeks! They are slow and require a lot of attachments? Many swear by them and the Tomz sharpener also. But I think a lot of sharpening involves just learning how to use a particular process, one that works for you. Tormeks should be faster than sharpening entirely by hand and may help you keep a consistent angle with the right jig. I use the Burke sharpener. It is faster but requires you to sharpen tools free hand rather than using jigs.
            My hands aren't as steady as they once were. I like the Tormek jigs because the hold the angle instead of me.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by russ498 View Post
              . What other tools do you consider equal. I would like to find good quality tools maybe a bit cheaper than Pfeil.

              The tools such as Two Cherries, Henry Taylor and others aren’t going to save you coin the comparable tools have comparable prices.

              I buy most of my tools used on eBay I like to by sets and then sell the tools I don’t need individually. This usually results in getting Pfeil gouges for around $20 each. You have to watch daily and jump on the good deals. Usually being sold by estate-sale shoppers who don’t know anything about tools.

              You can also buy and successfully carve with cheaper tools like Drake, OCCT or flexcut but they are cheaper for a reason.

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              • #8
                I have had a tormek for a number years. I only get it out once a year, some times twice when I have a number of tools I want to tune up. Most of the time stropping or if needed a few passes on a high grit 3m paper. It is faster than setting up the tormek jigs and dealing with the water tank. If I knew then what I know now I would have gone with the basic Burke for my power sharpener and not have spent all the money on the tormek and the jigs.
                We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
                https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                  Take a look at TomZ slow and easy
                  Agreed!

                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mpounders View Post
                    That is also the bad thing about the Tormeks! They are slow and require a lot of attachments?
                    I agree with Mike. The other thing you need to consider with the Tormek, or any brand sharpener that uses jigs that hold the tool on the round, outer edge of the wheel, is the end result will be a concave bevel. This is what you want on wood-lathe tools, but not so good for carving tools. And, of course, the larger the tool (bevel), the more pronounced the concave surface will be.

                    I use a Tormek clone for repairing or reshaping carving tools, but use it free-hand. If you're handy, you can make a sharpener similar to the Burke unit:

                    https://shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com/projects.html
                    ....Dave
                    Old carvers never die... they just whittle away.
                    www.shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com

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                    • #11
                      I think a lot of sharpening involves just learning how to use a particular process, one that works for you.
                      High PR backlinks

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brofosena View Post
                        I think a lot of sharpening involves just learning how to use a particular process, one that works for you.
                        Agree.... This is one area that often can be said what works for a person might not work for the next one. All of us have very different methods that work. Some of us use various machines...other use stones, and yet some use diamonds sharpener and still other use just sandpaper.

                        . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                        • #13
                          Pick a process and learn it well. I was taught freehand sharpening and I decided that I was going to become very good at it. I am. Besides body posture and movement, the key point for me was to learn the bevel angle that I was supposed to maintain. I had been just hopelessly wrong.

                          I've watched film of Mungo Martin holding his best crooked knife over his knee and tuning it up with a rock and a bucket of water. If he could, so can I.

                          Also, I'm convinced that some carvers have physical limitations that eliminate some sharpening techniques. So be it. I hope they find one that they can manage effectively.
                          Brian T

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                          • #14
                            Having been raised around the meatpacking business, I found that it would be surprised how different meat cutters shapen their knives & each feeling his way was the best way
                            . . .JoeB

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