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Pen or Pencil?

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  • Claude
    replied
    #2 pencil for me. Graphite paper for the pattern transfer. Throw my safety glove in the washing machine every so often. Any leftover pencil marks are scrubbed off with a 3M bristle disc in my Dremel; girl is scrubbed off with clear dish soap. Bristle disc also gets any fuzzies out of the cuts, and if it can't get them, then the diamond burrs in the Dremel will.

    Claude

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Only ever used pencil. If one is worried about smearing it then I use a trick I got from this forum and spray it with Hair spray. That holds the lines pretty well.

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  • Gulf Coast Handyman
    replied
    Pencil for me.

    Dave

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  • Nebraska
    replied
    Originally posted by johnvansyckel View Post
    I think he may use whichever is handy.

    I don't think it matters as long as the ink does not absorb into the wood.
    It appears to me that he may use ink for marking areas where the mark will remain for awhile and pencil for marks that are getting carved away right away.

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  • johnvansyckel
    replied
    I think he may use whichever is handy.
    Here he used both .... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anAo...l=JamesNorbury
    Here he uses pencil ...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT68...l=JamesNorbury
    Other videos ink.
    I don't think it matters as long as the ink does not absorb into the wood.
    Last edited by johnvansyckel; 01-11-2022, 10:38 AM.

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  • Eddy-Smiles
    replied
    Given that I have the artistic talent of a Shmoo and find it difficult to draw a straight line with a ruler I lean towards graphite and collect 4B pencils. The way I figure it that why Proctor and Gamble invented Dawn. Yes it gets messy but any product that can remove fuel oil off a Duck's back should have no problem with a little smudge!

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  • Stevee
    replied
    I started using mechanical pencils. The line is fine and doesn't smudge as much. Pens don't seem as user friendly.

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  • Just Carving
    replied
    Whatever soft lead pencil I have on hand. I tried pens but they either dry up or get clogged. I haven't tried gel pens though.

    BobL

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Very soft 4B pencils for low pressure and graphite paper, not carbon paper (greasy).
    An artist's graphite stick is even better.

    China markers, grease pencils, don't soak in at all, many colors and really easy to shave off.

    I can't tell by looking, how absorbent the wood will be and how much that might change
    over the length of the carving. The butterfly storey poles are 64" tall and I'd rather do all the line work with a 4B or 6B pencil. Those flat carpenter's pencils are pretty good, too.

    I don't care if it smears, I will be carving/shaving it off anyway. I might have to replace the center line 5-10 times to try to keep the left/right symmetry.

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  • pallin
    replied
    I put the major reference lines of the pattern on the wood with transfer paper and carve it away as I proceed.

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  • tbox61
    replied
    #2 pencil for me...if I can't erase it off the wood, I carve it off. I use a white fabric marker when carving bark. If it doesn't get carved off, I can use a nylon brush and get it off the bark...

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  • NoDNA
    replied
    After a layout and a lot of study I will usually just use a pencil to draw out my pattern. Or if I'm on a flat I'll us a copy paper, pencil is prime. Oh and I always have a white eraser, the red ones smear.

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  • sappy
    replied
    Pencils for me. Easier to change. Ink smears for me. I like F lead.

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    I'm a bother guy. When I first lay my pattern down is the time I use the ink/gel, after I start carving I use aq 4B. I like the way you can mark on your rough-out wood areas. When I'm getting to a finish stage, I still use the 4B, so I outline my carving, the line comes off when I power brush with a mandrel with non-woven fabric, which is usually by final step before painting.

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  • Nebraska
    replied
    Originally posted by Randy View Post
    I have been a pencil person but started using gell pens after taking a class with a carver named Dylan Goodson. They make a clean line and do not smear like led will. If you ahve not seen his work you will like his faces Ed. https://oldoakenterprises.com/galler...s-woodspirits/
    Thanks for the info and the share real nice works.

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