Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

First V-tool

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • First V-tool

    Hi,
    I want begin to buy a 3mm/4mm v-tool to add some details.
    A question i saw that there are tool of different angle, what they are for? what you suggest to add beard, hair detail on a 1x1x6 inches character. Sorry for the vague question, but i didnt find a good details on this to clear what i need.

    Thanks,
    Carlo.

  • #2
    I mostly reach for my #12.

    Comment


    • #3
      Like Ed I mostly use the 60 degree V tool. I use them more than the 45 degree tools I have.
      We live in the land of the free because of the brave! Semper Fi
      https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

      Comment


      • #4
        Only v tool I use is my mini dockyard. The rest seem to sit in the chisel holder. I really do not like using them. I am mostly a gouge, straight line, and fishtail chisel tool person.
        . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm with Randy. A 60 to a 90 degree tool would be my choice with the 45 being the smallest angled tool I'd use. The narrower they get the more difficult I find them to use.


          Comment


          • #6
            The different angles are going to give you different shaped cuts. Just like a 'u' shape will give a rounded bottom, a 'v' will give a two sided slot. The difference in the angle produces a difference in the width of the slot. Does that make sense? As to which one is best, it is mostly personal preference, and size of carving. I find I use the 60 degree and the 45 most of the time, but that is just my preference. If you know some one who has v tools, ask to see the cuts they make. That is the best way to learn.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not all tool manufacturers offer a variety of V-tools. Some make only the #12 (60 deg.) Pfeil (Swiss Made) offers five angles. They are also available in spoon bent, long bent, palm & standard handles. Many carvers use V-tools for detailing hair & beards, which are not uniform grooves.

              Comment


              • #8
                I would consider a 'Palm Tool' when working with the 1x1x6. The 60 degree would also be recommended.
                The Pfeil - Swiss Made 4mm 60 degree palm tool is a great all around quality tool and one that you will use for many things.

                Jackson's art supplies in London (link below) has a good price and ships worldwide. The model number: L- linoleum, 12-60 deg. and 4 - is 4 mm. Although it identifies 'linoleum' this is a wood carving tool. More Pfeil info here https://pfeiltools.ch/products/?lang=en

                https://www.jacksonsart.com/en-us/pf...-cutter-l-12-4

                You will only need a good strop and compound to maintain the edge. You can make your own or buy something like this https://www.amazon.com/Flexcut-Slips...3039929&sr=8-6
                Screenshot 2022-01-24 11.01.59 AM.png
                I would be very cautious of cheap 'V' tools as they tend to be very poorly sharpened. I have had problems with 'Ramelson' and 'Flexcut' but I'm confident that my Pfeil will last forever.

                There is also a 45 degree, 2mm tool that is good for very fine details: have a look at the L-15-2 by Pfeil
                Last edited by johnvansyckel; 01-24-2022, 10:32 AM.
                John
                ​​​​​
                "Quality is not expensive. It is priceless!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm currently raising some features on a carving. I cut around the features with a v-tool. I usually use the Pfeil #12-6 mm. That's a 45º tool.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I use a Drake palm 60°~1/16 for doing hair
                    . . .JoeB

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I learned in an on-line class from Dave Stetson, to use a #11 in several widths for hair and beards. Start with a #11 - 6mm to carve "S" curves for the general shape of the hair, then use #11 - 3mm and #11 - 2mm to add detail to the curves. The #11 has a rounded bottom, and high sides. The gouges can be tilted from side to side as one carves a curve (flatter on the outside of the curve, steeper on the inside, for example) to give additional texture to the hair. Here was my attempt: https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...n-line-classes

                      Claude
                      My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
                      My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/
                      My Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/claudeswoodcarving/
                      My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                        I use a Drake palm 60°~1/16 for doing hair
                        I use the same! Love my Drake tools!

                        Dave

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I find any angle less than 45 degrees useless in basswood; I don't really like V tools, and rarely use them, but when I do, I use the 90 most, sometimes the 60.
                          Arthur

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X