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  • Knife Modification



    I keep thinking I would like a pocket knife that would be good for wood carving. I am not sure why, since I seldom have an opportunity when I am out and about, and I use my fixed blade knifes and tools when carving at home. But I always carry a pocket knife and use it for all kinds of things and I keep thinking I might carve if the opportunity presented itself and I had a proper tool. I saw where a guy had modified the blade and handle on an Opinel pocket knife and thought I would give it a try. You can get different sizes and some come with carbon steel blades, so I picked up a couple of #7s with carbon blades. It is a single 3" flat ground blade with a wooden handle, that locks open and closed with a ring. I used a sander to grind it down to a 2" blade of the style I like and carved on the handle a bit. The handle is beech and was tough enough that I decided to power carve it. Very easy to sharpen to a carving edge and it locks in place with no wobbles. The wooden handle also makes it very light for the size, which is about 4 " closed. There is plenty of metal for an up sweep blade if that is what you prefer and the cost was only $15 per knife. It really cuts well. Thanks for looking!
    'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

    http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
    http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    There's no picture, Mike.
    Keep On Carvin'
    Bob K.

    My Woodcarving blog: https://www.woodchipchatter.com


    My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


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    Comment


    • #3
      cb809267-eb42-454c-91c1-c627c5214bbd.jpg
      Here is the knife rather nice looking for a pocket knife. Ratings are good for this kind of knife.... plus they have different handle including walnut. This one is fourteen dollars on Amazon. And look like I am very interested. Thanks Mike
      Last edited by DiLeon; 01-25-2022, 11:50 AM.
      . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

      Comment


      • #4
        Mike,

        Would love to see a pic. I modified one a long time ago. I like it alot. Whancliffe modified. Also, worked on handle. It is an inox. Thin blade. I did a no 6. May do a no 7 at some point.

        Rob

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mpounders View Post


          I keep thinking I would like a pocket knife that would be good for wood carving. I am not sure why, since I seldom have an opportunity when I am out and about, and I use my fixed blade knifes and tools when carving at home. But I always carry a pocket knife and use it for all kinds of things and I keep thinking I might carve if the opportunity presented itself and I had a proper tool. I saw where a guy had modified the blade and handle on an Opinel pocket knife and thought I would give it a try. You can get different sizes and some come with carbon steel blades, so I picked up a couple of #7s with carbon blades. It is a single 3" flat ground blade with a wooden handle, that locks open and closed with a ring. I used a sander to grind it down to a 2" blade of the style I like and carved on the handle a bit. The handle is beech and was tough enough that I decided to power carve it. Very easy to sharpen to a carving edge and it locks in place with no wobbles. The wooden handle also makes it very light for the size, which is about 4 " closed. There is plenty of metal for an up sweep blade if that is what you prefer and the cost was only $15 per knife. It really cuts well. Thanks for looking!
          You need to repost the picture Mike. I'd love to take a look at it.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have an Opinel, but no carbon steel. Would like to See your picture.

            Comment


            • #7
              You tease, wet out appetite then walk away
              . . .JoeB

              Comment


              • #8
                Goodness, what happened to the pictures! Lets try again.
                You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                This gallery has 4 photos.
                'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

                http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
                https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
                http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nice remodel job Mike
                  . . .JoeB

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice looking knife, Mike. What is the blade thickness?

                    Claude
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
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                    • #11
                      When we were camping a lot and hosting at state and federal parks I always carried my old Case XX and my Leatherman tool. I could use the Tool to "saw" off a small branch or limb, and carve something with my Case. Also, I used the Tool for sharpening( included file) my Case when it needed. Nothing special and no fancy things, and the kids always were happy to get a "Whale, squirrel, or seal, lil dog" what ever. The Case XX has 2 blades and is very handy and the "tool" rides on the belt.
                      That's all.
                      Chuck
                      Chuck
                      Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

                      https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hindsight tells me that every carver should mess with a little bit of knife making.
                        Not a forge with the fires of Hell but a new blade of good steel (usually free),
                        and a custom handle that fits your grip.

                        Revise another knife. Scavenge old leaf springs. SawzAll blades are really good.
                        I use a lot of poofed out, farrier's hoof trimming crooked knives.

                        I will never be a blade-smith.
                        But, I have a great appreciation for the skills of those from whom I buy blades.
                        I can't possibly argue with prices when I hold in my hand what I just bought for an adze blade.

                        Back about 1800 and up, First Nations were forging Mocotaugan design blades from 6" files, purchased from the Hudson's Bay Fur Trading Company.
                        The "forge" was a dirt-covered trench in the ground.
                        Brian T

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                        • #13
                          That's a really nice handle, Mike! You must wear a glove when using it, though. It looks a bit rough. Maybe you have callouses like I did when I was working for a living!

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                          • #14
                            Nice project sure it was a lot of fun.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                              Hindsight tells me that every carver should mess with a little bit of knife making.
                              Not a forge with the fires of Hell but a new blade of good steel (usually free),
                              and a custom handle that fits your grip.

                              Revise another knife. Scavenge old leaf springs. SawzAll blades are really good.
                              I use a lot of poofed out, farrier's hoof trimming crooked knives.

                              I will never be a blade-smith.
                              But, I have a great appreciation for the skills of those from whom I buy blades.
                              I can't possibly argue with prices when I hold in my hand what I just bought for an adze blade.

                              Back about 1800 and up, First Nations were forging Mocotaugan design blades from 6" files, purchased from the Hudson's Bay Fur Trading Company.
                              The "forge" was a dirt-covered trench in the ground.
                              I agree with this until you learn to resharpen and make your own handle ...You will understand sharpening to a whole new level, not for beginners but later on. A sense of pride comes from making your own....as least it does for me.
                              . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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