Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Strop Question ...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Strop Question ...

    For those that use a stropping board do you ever clean the leather or just keep adding compound on top of compound? If you do clean it what do you use?

    It seems it is getting harder for the leather to accept the compound like it did in the beginning do to all the use. Make sense?

    Or is this how you want your stropping board to get?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: Strop Question ...

    I never have cleaned mine and have a couple that are 15 or 20 years old. I know some folks do clean theirs because of build up. Had never given it much thought until now, maybe it has something to do with the compound used? I have always used a fairly dry compound kind of like the yellowstone that I use now. Maybe that has something to do with it. Beats me.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Strop Question ...

      Sorry, I don't know anyone in the club who has cleaned a strop.

      Joggernot

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Strop Question ...

        Do a search on this topic. I think there have been many questions on this very topic. I do clean mine from time to time, but everyone has their preference.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Strop Question ...

          I bought a knife and strop from John Dunkle. John and Herb Dunkle have made and sold knives for years, and they also sold Yellowstone stropping compound. John now sells a similar product called Blue Velvet. Both are great stropping compounds! I asked him when to recharge the strop and when to clean it and he said to never clean it. Just keep using it, the blacker the better. So that's what I've done for several years and it works great. Others say they like to scrape theirs clean and start with a fresh charge. It probably doens't make a big difference. The new Blue Velvet comes in a powder form, so it's easier to apply than the original Yellowstone but I'm guessing they're basically the same compound, just a different color. Good luck. Mike
          Matthew

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Strop Question ...

            Hello My Name Is Mikedon I Am New to the Club I Use It about Three Different Compounds and They All Seem to Do a Pretty Good Job I Never Clean Any of the Leather Is Better When It Is Black and Gives a Better Shine to the Edge Which Makes It like a Razor.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Strop Question ...

              I've never cleaned my strop but then I haven't been carving all that long.

              Here's a question, my strop has fuzzy leather on one side and the smooth leather on the other. What's the difference?
              Ron T.
              http://stickcarving.webs.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Strop Question ...

                I clean the surface and reapply compound. The black gunk is actually small metal particles which do not help in removing steel or polishing.

                I prefer a clean surface and newly applied Yellowstone is my favorite.

                I also use green CrO and black Cubic Boron Nitride in powder form and on occasion, diamond powder suspended in oil, these are all applied to a thin hard leather strop dedicated to each material.

                Yes, everything works however, which is faster and more efficient?

                Excessive stropping with a slow cutting compound will make dubbed edges more of a problem.

                Regards,
                FK

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Strop Question ...

                  Ron, don't know why your strop would have the smooth (skin) side of the leather out. Unless it is intended as a super-smooth, no compound, strop to finish the tool. I have not seen this done and can't imagine it being necessary. The smooth side of leather would still hold some compound; but, not nearly to the degree that the rough (flesh) side of the leather will. I am assuming that your leather is glued to a board and you are not seeing both sides of the same piece of leather.

                  Interestingly, I watched Harold Enlow sharpening a knife a few years ago. He took an old piece of plastic webbing, put some compound on it, placed it flat on a table and used it as a strop. He told me, "It's a lot easier to carry the webbing and a block of compound, than it is a strop." Makes sense, but, then, Harold doesn't look unprofessional no matter what he does, while the rest of us..............

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Strop Question ...

                    I just started using White Gold, works great! No major build up at all.

                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Strop Question ...

                      I am afraid I am of the opposite opinion to Paul, sorry Paul.
                      I do use the flexcut strop, which is rough; but my home made stop has both rough and smooth and I prefer the smooth and it is pretty thick with the green stick. I have also tried the smooth cardboard with a bit of compound method that someone recommended. I can't say it helps but certainly does not hurt.
                      The main reason I use the smooth side is because I was at a show and they had a whittling contest with several well known carvers, and I noticed 2 things. They had about a 10 inch strop, smooth side out and thick with compound and they spent their time carving not stropping. BTW, a lesson I still need to learn.
                      I think paying attention to how you are stropping is more important than the medium.
                      Paul are you talking about the kind of webbing used for straps or belts?
                      Jim

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Strop Question ...

                        I tumble rock, too. I take some cerium oxide polish, make a paste, and put it in a small jar. When I need some for the strop, just use the knife to put some on the strop (smooth). This seems to work for me, but remember I'm a beginner.

                        Joggernot

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Strop Question ...

                          Originally posted by Joggernot View Post
                          I tumble rock, too. I take some cerium oxide polish, make a paste, and put it in a small jar. When I need some for the strop, just use the knife to put some on the strop (smooth). This seems to work for me, but remember I'm a beginner.

                          Joggernot
                          If it works, it's good! The name of the game is keeping your tools sharp, not how you accomplish it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Strop Question ...

                            Originally posted by Paul_Guraedy View Post
                            Ron, don't know why your strop would have the smooth (skin) side of the leather out. Unless it is intended as a super-smooth, no compound, strop to finish the tool. I have not seen this done and can't imagine it being necessary. The smooth side of leather would still hold some compound; but, not nearly to the degree that the rough (flesh) side of the leather will. I am assuming that your leather is glued to a board and you are not seeing both sides of the same piece of leather.

                            Interestingly, I watched Harold Enlow sharpening a knife a few years ago. He took an old piece of plastic webbing, put some compound on it, placed it flat on a table and used it as a strop. He told me, "It's a lot easier to carry the webbing and a block of compound, than it is a strop." Makes sense, but, then, Harold doesn't look unprofessional no matter what he does, while the rest of us..............
                            Hi Paul,

                            Thank you for your response. I made my strop using an old belt and glued two pieces to each side of a stick. I just copied another strop I saw somewhere. I load both sides with compound but mainly use the rough side.
                            Ron T.
                            http://stickcarving.webs.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Strop Question ...

                              Canopener, no problem with dissenting opinions. No bread can be sliced so thin that there are not two sides.

                              There is no reason that the thin side should definitely not be out, just that I have not seen it. But, I also have not paid attention to commercial strops, they may be made that way as the glue would hold better if you did not want to take the time to put them in a vice (I was into leather work prior to woodcarving).

                              The smooth side would not hold the compound to the extent that the flesh side will and the compound is what is doing the work. My strops are about a foot long and glued to a board. I have one that is about 20 years old and the "youngster" about 8. I have never bothered "cleaning" them as the build up of compound and metal eventually flakes off. One thought, did you take a close look at the strops? Mine have a very slick, shiny almost, black surface and you would have to examine them to note that the flesh side is out.

                              I keep them well loaded with compound and strop often. Now, when I say that I strop often, I mean that I take no more than 2-3 swipes with the tool I am using, or have just picked up. Stropping, to me, means maintaining, not creating, a sharp edge. This method keeps tools sharp and does not delay, or take away, from my carving time.

                              The webbing I saw Harold using looked like the type used in chairs. He said, "that it was the compound doing the work" so anything that will provide a smooth, hard surface should work.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X