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  • Buffing wheel sharpening

    Hi Gang,
    I'm putting an article together. Does anyone know of a well know carver (should be an author or active on the teaching circuit) who sharpens his or her tools with a grinder and buffing wheel?

    Thanks!

    Bob

  • #2
    Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

    Hmmmmm...Lemme' think,,,,

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

      LOL...I forgot about that, Mark! I'll be e-mailing you.

      Bob

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

        allen goodman, agoodknife on the forum

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

          And Mike Shipley...that's his instruction that comes with his knives.

          Corey

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

            Originally posted by BobD View Post
            Hi Gang,
            I'm putting an article together. Does anyone know of a well know carver (should be an author or active on the teaching circuit) who sharpens his or her tools with a grinder and buffing wheel?

            Thanks!

            Bob
            ahhhhhh......how about Rick from Seattle...he has more tricks on how to sharpen a knife...than Betty Crocker has recipe's

            Jim Q

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

              I second the recommendation for Allen. I've seen people sharpen, but Allen has it down to a science. You would have a great article that would be packed full of useful information.

              Blake

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                Bob, I think Phil Bishop uses an upright sander, and then a buffing wheel just for the fact that he can do it much faster in a classroom situation.

                Tom
                If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

                www.spokanecarvers.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                  Either Fred or Elaine Stenman from STENMAN STUDIOS RELIEF WOODCARVING

                  Al

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                    Hey Bob, ironically enough after our conversation I had an opportunity tonight to change some old chisels I decided to use. And they happen to be Addis which is what was brought up on another post.
                    Anyway, I changed the bevels on these very quickly using a bench grinder. There was a bit of metal to be removed and this made quick work of it.These things are hard steel! In the first photo you can see the remnants of an initial polishing I gave them right along the edge. This polished area gave me a guide. In the photo you can see how I brought the grind to less than a sixteenth of the edge using the polished area as a guide line. I held the bevel constant from heel to edge.

                    Once it was finished I polished it off on the bench grinder as well. Came out nice and smooth. (second photo)

                    How did they cut? Well , in this Basswood for the brackets I could take beautiful long finishing cuts,,almost so thin the curl didn't hold together and left a finish as if I had just waxed it. Made deeper cuts without effort. Almost can't keep up with the chisels they cut so well. These things are wicked!

                    So , yeah,, it works well.

                    Now I also had one of my regular Swiss chisels that needed a bit of touching up. Here I went with my wet stone. Just for fun I decided to time myself to see just how slow using a wet stone really is when retouching a chisel. Took me 40 seconds to get the bevel back to where it was ready to buff on the high speed grinder. The thing cuts like a demon.

                    I'm sure there are faster ways to do this considering all the methods discussed here but I don't think 40 seconds is all that bad. The other morning I went through 20 chisels,,took about 15 minutes total. ( some better than others) Now I'm usually pressed for time and tend to work fairly quickly but am I interested in saving more time because a wet stone is slow? If anyone is that pressed for time and needs to cut their sharpening time down to say,,20 seconds,,or 10 seconds per chisel,, well,carving isn't the hobby to pick.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                      Mark,

                      Not at all well versed in grinders, what grit stone are you using on your grinder? I may have to give this a try since I can't seem to get my act together in getting my tools sharpened--as they say: Too much to do, not enough hours in the day.

                      Bob L

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                        Well Bob L, the label isn't on the stone indicating the grit. Sorry. But it's a white stone , fairly fine grit , smooth and cool cutting and yet cuts pretty quickly.
                        Now understand I DON'T USE THIS TOOL AS MY REGULAR WAY TO ADDRESS A CHISEL. I only use this as a quick way to change a bevel ( these were old tools I hadn't used and didn't like the bevel they had) and remove metal quickly. I could use my regular wet stones but naturally that takes a little longer but would do the job just as well with MUCH LESS RISK.
                        The risk? Yes, overheating the tool, cutting too much too fast in the wrong areas and making a mess of things VERY quickly if you're not sure what your looking for as well as doing. I've made quite a few knives , made a number of chisels , I make my router bits , shaper bits and blades for my planer and change their profiles as well as sharpen them on this as well as sharpen my drill bits, and have played with this tool long enough in this capacity to have a pretty good eye, feel and instinct as to just what is happening as I use it.
                        Do I suggest this tool to someone having difficulty and trying to figure out how to sharpen a chisel?
                        NO!
                        I don't mean to sound crass,,but if you're having difficulty using more traditional methods and are having a hard time finding what to do,,using this then I fear would only spell disaster.
                        I tend to fall on the side of caution. As I said, this can create a mess very quickly and turn a great chisel into a useless paint can opener in a heartbeat.

                        In my post you'll also see that I did one of my regular chisels at the same time,,but DIDN'T use this tool for dressing up the bevel. The bevel is essentially where I want it. So a quick pass over the wet stones (40 seconds is all it took) brought it right back to where I wanted it and then just buffed it to final sharpness.
                        And that's all I use to generally maintain my chisels.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                          Thanks Mark. Just curious what stone is used to make major changes on a tool as in your case, the bevel.

                          Bob L

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                            I understand Bob,,and again,, didn't mean to sound brash or overbearing. But,, this type of tool can be a blessing,,or a curse.
                            I just want to be clear that this isn't my primary way to sharpen chisels. It's not designed nor intended for that. It can lay waste to a tool in seconds flat and not think twice about it. It can and does remove a lot of metal quickly which is the only thing I'm looking for. A wet stone will do the exact same thing just at a slower, less risky, more controlled pace.
                            One bad pass on a wet stone and little has changed. One bad pass on a high speed grinder and the tool is now junk.
                            And even though the bevel has changed,and I can pull it right to the edge,and by all outward appearances it looks very nice, it's not the finish I want before I take it to the buffer.

                            But do I like and depend on high speed grinders? Yeah, I have 3 of them and I'm buying a fourth.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Buffing wheel sharpening

                              Thanks Mark.

                              Bob L

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