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  • Cutting edge bevel

    A question that I think I should know the answer to, but don't.

    Why is there a bevel on the cutting edge of a carving knife?
    I just received an OAR Detail 2-blade pocket knife. When asked if I wanted the factory edge sharpened, I asked "how is it sharpened"? Answer it's sharpened to carve Basswood. So, I said OK, knowing that I was probably going to send the new knife to Rick at Little Shavers to "really sharpen it", which means remove the bevel, and flat grind it.

    What's that bevel for.....I sure a hell cannot carve Basswood with it.

    Thanks

    Tom H
    http://beginnerscarvingcorner.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    Re: Cutting edge bevel

    Originally posted by Tom-H View Post
    A question that I think I should know the answer to, but don't.

    Why is there a bevel on the cutting edge of a carving knife?
    I just received an OAR Detail 2-blade pocket knife. When asked if I wanted the factory edge sharpened, I asked "how is it sharpened"? Answer it's sharpened to carve Basswood. So, I said OK, knowing that I was probably going to send the new knife to Rick at Little Shavers to "really sharpen it", which means remove the bevel, and flat grind it.

    What's that bevel for.....I sure a hell cannot carve Basswood with it.

    Thanks

    Tom H
    Same here. I flattened the grinds to zero bevel. I think the best bet is to get it unsharpened and then flatten the grinds. Little cheaper that way. However, it's a little less work to flatten the grinds if the bevels have been convexed down a bit.
    Terry

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    • #3
      Re: Cutting edge bevel

      I carve basswood with blades that have bevels all the time. My Solingen bench knife has a bevel and ,since it was my very first "real carving knife", I did the same on all the knives I made. The blades for my utility knife have a bevel, the scalpel blades I buy have a bevel, my pocketknife blades have a bevel, etc.. I guess it is a matter of what you are used to and personal preference.

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      • #4
        Re: Cutting edge bevel

        First, it makes the cutting edge a little stronger, less likely to chip. However, I think this would be more of a problem with hard woods. Second, it provides a relief behind the cutting edge. Your not dragging the entire edge through the wood. Only the secondary bevel. The only place I've seen a knife without a bevel is on Wayne Barton chip carving knives.

        Incidently, do you know that if you strop a knife on leather, your putting a microscopic secondary bevel on the blade?

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        • #5
          Re: Cutting edge bevel

          All good points. In fact I just tried the new knife again. I do carve a bit smaller than most, but the way the knife cuts, it just seems dull...But its not dull. Maybe the bevel just gets in the way. The way I use it, that is. Anyway it's off to Rick at Little Shavers, this AM.

          Tom H
          http://beginnerscarvingcorner.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Cutting edge bevel

            Originally posted by Nomad View Post
            Same here. I flattened the grinds to zero bevel. I think the best bet is to get it unsharpened and then flatten the grinds. Little cheaper that way. However, it's a little less work to flatten the grinds if the bevels have been convexed down a bit.

            I agree! A flat grind / bevel is the way to go. I also agree with Smee that a flat grind makes the blade more likely to chip, to me it's worth the risk.

            Dave

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