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  • #16
    You guys are digging up skeletons. That was a 2011 thread! Not much on the bench top any more. I've moved on to doing storey poles.
    Like a totem pole which explains something in the natural world. Nothing huge. Two poles are 64" and partly done.

    The chips all fall off on the floor.
    Brian T

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    • #17
      Brian, if your using a cheap synthetic brush that has its bristles that have curled, that’s what hangs on to the wood chips, poly bristles is what builds static charge. I like a stiff natural bristle paint brush. I’ve got tons from doing house painting for years but you can find new ones for cheap or close out at hardware/stores stores because oil paint is going away because of the VOC laws. If you coat the new or old brush with some thinned out linseed oil then let dry it will straighten the bristles from breaking and not allow dust to stick to it once full dry. It’s great to do to any natural bristle brush before you paint with it so the bristles aren’t so brital and break off in your paint or what your painting

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Brian T View Post
        You guys are digging up skeletons. That was a 2011 thread! Not much on the bench top any more. I've moved on to doing storey poles.
        Like a totem pole which explains something in the natural world. Nothing huge. Two poles are 64" and partly done.

        The chips all fall off on the floor.
        Well let’s see some pics B

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        • #19
          I purchased a small hand held "Shark" from Bed Bath and Beyond about 10 years ago and it can still suck the air out of a golf ball! Sweeping just adds more dust and dirt to your work space.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Vice View Post
            Brian, if your using a cheap synthetic brush that has its bristles that have curled, that’s what hangs on to the wood chips, poly bristles is what builds static charge. I like a stiff natural bristle paint brush. I’ve got tons from doing house painting for years but you can find new ones for cheap or close out at hardware/stores stores because oil paint is going away because of the VOC laws. If you coat the new or old brush with some thinned out linseed oil then let dry it will straighten the bristles from breaking and not allow dust to stick to it once full dry. It’s great to do to any natural bristle brush before you paint with it so the bristles aren’t so brital and break off in your paint or what your painting
            Wonder how the technique would work on artist brushes?
            Bill
            Living among knives and fire.

            http://www.westernwoodartist.com

            Comment


            • #21
              This is the life of a butterfly. You read poles from the bottom up. So there will be lots of eggs at the bottom.
              The western red cedar post was 5" x 5" x 64" and needed to be rounded off (elbow adze and draw knife.)

              There are 5 instars (life sizes) of caterpillars, I guessed at numbers and drew them around and the pole from templates.
              (Pacific Northwest native carvers make their templates from birch bark.) The caterpillars get bigger but fewer of them. Life lesson.

              I outlined them with a 1/8" bit, down 3/4" with a Rotozip. Spent a week with dental picks, digging out the packed chips.
              The cocoon will be on the "back side" and you can see the rough butterfly body, top front.

              As you can see, the poles don't actually rest on the bench (4" x 12" x 48".)
              I'm not concerned about chips making dents in the wood.

              Can't see but the next step is to round off all the caterpillar bodies with skews and crooked knives. STORY B.JPGSTORY H.jpg

              Brian T

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              • #22
                I use a bench brush made of horse hair for carpenters.....57213-11-1000.jpg, although it is noted we do not get static electric here do to high humidity.

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                • #23
                  Thanks Dileon, That's about what I have which collects mega dust.
                  Agree that it is super dry with static here in the winter in the coldest of winter.
                  If there's no simple solution, so be it.
                  Brian T

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post

                    Wonder how the technique would work on artist brushes?
                    I always soak a new natural bristle brush in some type of oil, I feel like they came treated when I was a kid, they had more of a shine and the bristles didn’t break off like new brush do. The guy guy who showed me how to carve signs would soak his poly bristlebrushes in wd40 so the heal of the brush wouldn’t get hard with old paint and they were easier to clean

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                    • #25
                      Nice tip Vice, and I never heard of it...but makes sense. Live and learn...I'll give it a try on a few artist brushes when I get back to oil painting. Thanks!
                      Bill
                      Living among knives and fire.

                      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        One trick that I have not tried is to scrub the bench brush with an anti-static sheet which I'd use in the clothes dryer.

                        I've always presoaked my watercolor and acrylic art brushes in water for 10 minutes.
                        As Vice points out, keeps the heel up in the ferrule from loading with paint
                        Brian T

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                        • #27
                          I use a Paint Brush like Slow Mover and it works well , they come in different size widths and are priced differently by the size. Great selections of the type Bristles for your liking . Works for me and Slow Mover . Try it you might find what you need. Merle

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                            This is the life of a butterfly. You read poles from the bottom up. So there will be lots of eggs at the bottom.
                            The western red cedar post was 5" x 5" x 64" and needed to be rounded off (elbow adze and draw knife.)

                            There are 5 instars (life sizes) of caterpillars, I guessed at numbers and drew them around and the pole from templates.
                            (Pacific Northwest native carvers make their templates from birch bark.) The caterpillars get bigger but fewer of them. Life lesson.

                            I outlined them with a 1/8" bit, down 3/4" with a Rotozip. Spent a week with dental picks, digging out the packed chips.
                            The cocoon will be on the "back side" and you can see the rough butterfly body, top front.

                            As you can see, the poles don't actually rest on the bench (4" x 12" x 48".)
                            I'm not concerned about chips making dents in the wood.

                            Can't see but the next step is to round off all the caterpillar bodies with skews and crooked knives. STORY B.JPGSTORY H.jpg
                            Give us a show when your done Brian

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I have a horsehair brush, and it's just like new, because more often than not, I fire up the shop vac that is right beside my carving table.

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