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more power from a electric motor???

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  • more power from a electric motor???

    I have the craftsmen 10 inch band saw. it does what I want, and im using timberwolf blades, until the blade begins to dull then the motor seems like it doenst have the juice to pull it and it quickly bogs down. If I take a lot of time and patience to keep working eventually it will cut thru. the obvious solution is to change the blade, but it really doesn't seem like the blade is dull it seems, like the motor isn't strong enough.
    so the question is there a way to juice up the electric motor inside the thing to deliver more power? something that a electric dumb person like myself can manage? I would guess there isn't and would require getting a bigger motor, just wondering.

  • #2
    Re: more power from a electric motor???

    Sorry, if you want more power, you need a bigger motor. You never know, there may be someone out there who has put a more powerful motor in that saw. It never hurts to use Google and see.

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    • #3
      Re: more power from a electric motor???

      first question...are you using an extension cord ??
      if so, is it rated appropriately? There will be power drop with smaller wire and if the outlet is at the end of a run in your house wiring, that will lead to a power drop as well...

      second...not all 2hp motors run at 2hp.
      some motors labeled as 2hp are actually 2hp PEAK...that means under full load.
      Craftsman is famous for this. They are less expensive motors...(sorry). More expensive motors rated at 2hp might actually run at 2.5hp under peak load...kinda weird, I know, it's all about $$$$$$

      IF your motor is wired for 110 OR 220 and it is connected to 110, you get a nasty power drop under load. Wiring 220 will eliminate some of that drop...

      I ended up with a Dewalt table saw, original motor was 5 hp and motor was AWOL when I got it. That motor has a frame with cast metal brackets for belt adjusting. I did some checking and the 7hp was AS cheap as the stock 5hp. Needless to say, I haven't fed it much that it didn't cut...and efficiently.
      Bigger motor....

      If you use the saw and experience blade speed reduction, kickbacks become a real problem. PLEASE use pushsticks or pushblocks??? AND A GUARD

      Other Solution??? there are TS blades that are a little thinner in the middle of the blade to allow for more clearance, so of the teeth are 1/8", the bulk of the middle of the blade might be somewhere between 3/32" and 7/64" to keep from binding...also allows blade to run cooler

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      • #4
        Re: more power from a electric motor???

        Kickback with a band saw?!

        In 35 years of using my bandsaw A LOT I have never experienced this.

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        • #5
          Re: more power from a electric motor???

          ok thanks for the feedback. I have 220 in the basement and that is what runs the saw, no extension cord. so the guess is its vastly underpowered. I have my ey on the rikon 14 inch woodcraft sells and patiencely waiting for it to go on sale again, even if I cant afford the 400 sale price. I guess if a person is smart enough replacing the motor is a possibility but im not smart enough the only other problem I have is if I buy the rikon who is going to carry it into the basement for me? I know my sons,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, another good laff

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          • #6
            Re: more power from a electric motor???

            Originally posted by Rick Wiebe View Post
            Kickback with a band saw?!

            In 35 years of using my bandsaw A LOT I have never experienced this.
            okay...brain spasm...Read BAND SAW....was thinking TABLE SAW...

            still thinking table saw.....

            sorry

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            • #7
              Re: more power from a electric motor???

              RickM, the real fix is to not use dull blades. you say it runs fine until they are dull...

              dull blade = burnt work or broken blade, more power just gonna burn or break it faster.

              There is one simple way to get a bit more power out of your setup- change the pulleys if possible. Smaller pulley on the moter and/or larger on the machine. Blade will move slower
              Buffalo Bif
              www.bflobif.com

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              • #8
                Re: more power from a electric motor???

                bill I gotta check that out thanks.

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                • #9
                  Re: more power from a electric motor???

                  Besides a good blade I don't believe there is any other hope for these saws. The way the 10" Rikon and Craftsman bandsaws are designed I can't see anyway of changing out the motor or pulleys with out a major revamp. It would be cheaper to dump this saw and buy bigger powered with a separate motor using a pulley system.

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                  • #10
                    Re: more power from a electric motor???

                    You shouldn't even attempt to increase the amps by installing a larger breaker or double polling the circuit. You need to put a meter on the outlet its plugged in if you get between 110 to 120 you are golden. My guess the brushes are worn down or the motor is just too small not enough amps.

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                    • #11
                      Re: more power from a electric motor???

                      Check your blade guides...If you are running the teeth through the guides you'll wreck the set and the blade will drag and stall the motor. This would show as a still sharp blade but with no set to the teeth.

                      Al

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                      • #12
                        Re: more power from a electric motor???

                        I think AlArchie has the likely solution. The teeth of nearly all types of saws have a "set" (the teeth are actually bent to each side) which makes the saw kerf (cut) slightly wider than the thickness of the saw blade. On a bandsaw, the set can be quickly lost if the blade guides are not adjusted properly. The result is greatly increased friction between the wood and the sides of the blade, with scorching of the wood and difficult curves.

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