Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

    Carving Supplies - Deepwoods Ventures

  • #2
    Re: Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

    Thanks for the link Dave! Very interesting and easy to understand.
    Have A Great Day
    Terry
    Of all the things I have lost I miss my mind the most!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

      That's great info Dave. Thanks! Just to add, how well a knife holds an edge is not based on the Rockwell alone. So for instance, if vanadium is in the steel, that will increase wear resistance, and of course, edge geometry will play a role as well.
      Terry

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

        thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

          That's good into. Another thing to note is that some blades have multiple hardness due to having laminated steel. For instance, many Mora knives and Scandinavian knives have a hard piece of steel laminated between two softer pieces of steel. This means at the edge you might have a 59HRC or 60 HRC but towards the spine where the steel is thicker you might have a hardness of 52. This increases the knife's durability in that it is less likely to snap. Yet it will still have a hard edge for cutting purposes. Steel is a wondrous invention and the variations mean you can get about anything you desire these days if you look hard enough. My Finnish puukkos that I listed earlier in this thread are heat treated and tempered to 59 HRC whereas a stainless version will run at 57 HRC. They are also available in laminated form.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Rockwell Hardness Explained From Deepwoods

            Here's a pic of knife with imagined laminated steel as I described above. (Mine is really solid steel all at 59HRC, but you get the point.)

            Comment

            Working...
            X