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Brian T
Brian T
Senior Member
Last Activity: Today, 02:11 AM
Joined: 01-29-2011
Location: McBride, BC, 53N, HWY16
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  • Brian T
    replied to Learning relief carving
    My introduction to wood carving was a gifted relief carving course over 2 weekends. Bought some tools, had a very good time with a full-time pro carver instructor. That was it for several years of doing nothing. I can't recall what rekindled my interest. I had to go back and get a free hand sharpening...
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  • Brian T
    replied to Learning relief carving
    Welcome, RJ.

    1. If you have no ready supply of local free wood then you will need to buy some.
    Heineke appears to sell very nice bass wood for carving.

    2. You will need to have a couple of very strong straight knives, later some gouges.

    3. Your tools...
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  • Brian T
    replied to ~~Stylized Rhino~~
    I appreciate these kinds of carvings which are mere suggestions of form.
    There can't be any doubt about the subject.
    Photographic accuracy has its place, I suppose, but not on my table.

    >>> Do it. Again. Look at the gross anatomy of a western North American bison....
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  • Brian T
    replied to ~~Bigger Elephant Head~~
    Neat thing about a glue-up, you can plan elements of grain direction for carving.
    What sorts of tools do you plan to use for the rough-out stage?

    I live not far from a SPF pallet construction business. I get compressed wood pellets delivered by the ton (2,000lbs) on a fresh new pallet....
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  • Brian T
    replied to Just Wanted to say
    Thanks and the same for you. Bizarre weather here from 112F down to maybe 65 or less in the house last night. The central heating furnace came on 4 AM for a welcome blast. Creaky old Heidi-cat demands a place under the covers.
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  • Haida, Tsimshian and Tlingit First Nations used to live in very large post & beam houses, sheeted with cedar planks. A really big house was 30' x 100'. The biggest split cedar house board measured was 14' tall x 36" wide x 3/4 inch thick (Franz Boas). Imagine what they must have thought...
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  • Brian T
    replied to Gouge Question
    I haven't got any of those Two Cherries tools. In fact, I have never even held one in my hand....
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  • Brian T
    replied to Gouge Question
    I see a 5/12 and a 5/6. The first number is the sweep, the curve, and the second number
    will be the width in millimeters. Two Cherries is a top European brand (Austria? Germany?)
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  • If you need to rent a power saw with a bigger bar (24" - 36",) I strongly suggest that you rent an operator together with the saw. Big saws are not like a home&garden 16" bar.
    That rotten Douglas fir log was bucked up by a pro with a 36" Stihl.
    A gas engine hydraulic...
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  • Brian T
    replied to good news
    Thanks. What a relief to read some good news for once....
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  • If those rounds have not shown any natural splits then start some radial ones with the chain saw.
    You will have to go all the way across the log as any uncut side will resist your splitting activity.
    Go down an inch. Enough to set some serious splitting wedges. I have some Delrin faller's...
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  • I don't mind buying poorly sharpened tools. I expect that I will put the bevel and the edge on that tool that I want for the carving that I will be doing. That means their steel treatment is a big deal to me. This isn't just judgement. I have a variety of bevel angles that work well.
    Even...
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  • Brian T
    replied to Next Escher Challenge
    I like the Mobius Red Ants. Dyed or painted porcupine quills are about as durable for antennae as you will ever need.

    What are you considering for overall size?
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  • Brian T
    replied to Torching a feather
    Sorry. I thought that it was clear. Burn first, fix then finish.
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  • Brian T
    replied to Torching a feather
    I think it looks fine. I like the smoothed appearance of the feather fiber.
    Q: how big is it? Don't hesitate to carve 24" and 36" feathers.

    A propane bottle torch is used here commonly to burn the fuzzies off a chainsaw carving (then wire brush) and/or to put black fur...
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  • Brian T
    replied to Carving Avo pits
    Plant cells always have the initial wall layer, called the primary cell wall. Usually very thin and soft, tomato, avocado, apple, orange and green pepper for examples. Under a microscope the texture looks quite foamy. Sometimes in ropey, stringy bundles such as the stringy stuff in celery stalks....
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  • Brian T
    replied to 3 Rings
    Magnificent grain patterns you bring out. Looks like 3 bagels that need eating.
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  • I do lines with a Moor Large Chip carving knife, the bevel is slanted downwards.
    It has taken extreme pressure most times for a deep cut. Why it has not snapped off, I don't know.
    Don't be deceived by the goofy-looking plastic handle: it does fit a human hand!
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  • Brian T
    replied to Humbling
    Sandpaper. The first iteration might have been what was called "glass paper."
    Crushed glass set in glue on paper. "Oh, have we invented cheap paper yet?"

    Prior to that, somebody figured out that Equisetum sp. (aka 'horsetail' these days)
    was very abrasive,...
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  • Brian T
    replied to Humbling
    I used to have some art history textbooks. No idea where they are now.
    What I do recall reading was a stone carver's "trick." They would mix up a very hard paste of wax and stone dust to fill in the "divots" and make repairs to an otherwise smooth surface. There's a word...
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